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Self-identity After Cancer: “Survivor”, “Victim”, “Patient”, and “Person with Cancer”

Self-identity After Cancer: “Survivor”, “Victim”, “Patient”, and “Person with Cancer” Survivor identity appears most common and most associated with active involvement and better psychological well-being, but other identifications are also common and simultaneously held. Adoption of specific cancer identities is likely to impact interactions with health care providers, including those in general internal medicine, and health behavior changes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of General Internal Medicine Springer Journals

Self-identity After Cancer: “Survivor”, “Victim”, “Patient”, and “Person with Cancer”

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References (34)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Society of General Internal Medicine
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Internal Medicine
ISSN
0884-8734
eISSN
1525-1497
DOI
10.1007/s11606-009-0993-x
pmid
19838845
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Survivor identity appears most common and most associated with active involvement and better psychological well-being, but other identifications are also common and simultaneously held. Adoption of specific cancer identities is likely to impact interactions with health care providers, including those in general internal medicine, and health behavior changes.

Journal

Journal of General Internal MedicineSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 18, 2009

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