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Socioeconomic Differences in Old Age MortalityConclusion

Socioeconomic Differences in Old Age Mortality: Conclusion Chapter 10 The main results from Chapter 8 with respect to the age pattern of socioeconomic mortality differences are: 1. Mortality differences between income groups are much larger in Denmark than in the USA. The comparison between these two countries once again illustrates the surprising fact that the level of social differences does not consistently cor- relate with the level of social inequality in health or mortality (see discussion in Section 4.2.1). At least, the research in this field seems to demonstrate the absence of a clear correlation (e.g., Huisman et al. 2003, 2004). 2. A simple interaction between age and income as an indicator for socioeconomic status shows only a very small convergence of mortality differences with age. In Denmark, where the pattern is much more reliable due to the large dataset, the mortality of the upper 75 percent of the income distribution approaches the mortality of the poorest 25 percent only by about 15 percent: from age 59 to age 99 the rate ratio changes from 0.40 to 0.55 for men and from 0.25 to 0.40 for women. It is difficult to compare these findings with other studies from other countries because measures for the amount of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Socioeconomic Differences in Old Age MortalityConclusion

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Netherlands 2008
ISBN
978-1-4020-8691-5
Pages
201 –203
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4020-8692-2_11
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 10 The main results from Chapter 8 with respect to the age pattern of socioeconomic mortality differences are: 1. Mortality differences between income groups are much larger in Denmark than in the USA. The comparison between these two countries once again illustrates the surprising fact that the level of social differences does not consistently cor- relate with the level of social inequality in health or mortality (see discussion in Section 4.2.1). At least, the research in this field seems to demonstrate the absence of a clear correlation (e.g., Huisman et al. 2003, 2004). 2. A simple interaction between age and income as an indicator for socioeconomic status shows only a very small convergence of mortality differences with age. In Denmark, where the pattern is much more reliable due to the large dataset, the mortality of the upper 75 percent of the income distribution approaches the mortality of the poorest 25 percent only by about 15 percent: from age 59 to age 99 the rate ratio changes from 0.40 to 0.55 for men and from 0.25 to 0.40 for women. It is difficult to compare these findings with other studies from other countries because measures for the amount of

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: Poor Health; Unobserved Heterogeneity; Mortality Difference; Social Difference; Single Cohort

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