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Sociology of Aging and DeathConcluding Comments: Looking Forward

Sociology of Aging and Death: Concluding Comments: Looking Forward [In conclusion, a crucial point to make is that old age is not of itself a medical “problem,” pathology, or statement of need, relating to death. “Older people” or an “aging population” are not a homogeneous group and categorization as a distinct service user group is, arguably, contentious—hence, the value of sociology (Chen & Powell, 2012). Furthermore, since the advent of personalization in the UK for particular, conceptualizing support by user groups is considered by many as obsolete (Poll & Duffy, 2008). People do not receive health services by virtue of being “older.” Rather they are in need of a service—for example, because of ill health, physical impairment, mental health difficulties, addiction, or offending.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Sociology of Aging and DeathConcluding Comments: Looking Forward

Part of the International Perspectives on Aging Book Series (volume 35)
Sociology of Aging and Death — Nov 26, 2022

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022
ISBN
978-3-031-19328-6
Pages
137 –148
DOI
10.1007/978-3-031-19329-3_11
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In conclusion, a crucial point to make is that old age is not of itself a medical “problem,” pathology, or statement of need, relating to death. “Older people” or an “aging population” are not a homogeneous group and categorization as a distinct service user group is, arguably, contentious—hence, the value of sociology (Chen & Powell, 2012). Furthermore, since the advent of personalization in the UK for particular, conceptualizing support by user groups is considered by many as obsolete (Poll & Duffy, 2008). People do not receive health services by virtue of being “older.” Rather they are in need of a service—for example, because of ill health, physical impairment, mental health difficulties, addiction, or offending.]

Published: Nov 26, 2022

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