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The effects of quality of working life (QWL) on employee behavioral responses

The effects of quality of working life (QWL) on employee behavioral responses Abstract Quality of work life (QWL) was conceptualized in terms of need satisfaction stemming from an interaction of workers' needs (survival, social, ego, and self-actualization needs) and those organizational resources relevant for meeting them. It was hypothesized that need satisfaction (or QWL) is positively related to organizational identification, job satisfaction, job involvement, job effort, job performance; and negatively related to personal alienation. A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 219 service deliverers to the elderly in a large midwestern city. The results were consistent with the hypotheses. Managerial implications were also discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Indicators Research Springer Journals

The effects of quality of working life (QWL) on employee behavioral responses

Social Indicators Research , Volume 22 (1): 17 – Feb 1, 1990

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References (61)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers
ISSN
0303-8300
eISSN
1573-0921
DOI
10.1007/BF00286389
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Quality of work life (QWL) was conceptualized in terms of need satisfaction stemming from an interaction of workers' needs (survival, social, ego, and self-actualization needs) and those organizational resources relevant for meeting them. It was hypothesized that need satisfaction (or QWL) is positively related to organizational identification, job satisfaction, job involvement, job effort, job performance; and negatively related to personal alienation. A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 219 service deliverers to the elderly in a large midwestern city. The results were consistent with the hypotheses. Managerial implications were also discussed.

Journal

Social Indicators ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 1990

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