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The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”A Plan for the Education of Youth

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”: A Plan for the Education of Youth [Academicus was a popular pseudonym in eighteenth-century English and American periodicals, used in connection with educational issues. In this case, Academicus was probably John Hobson, a Unitarian minister from Birmingham, England. Hobson fled Birmingham after the anti-Priestley riots of 1791, in which a mob burned down his church and home. Afterward Priestley and Hobson both left England for America, although it is clear from his absence in Priestley’s correspondence that they were not close, and it is unlikely that they traveled together. In fact, Hobson’s fondness for publishing inflammatory letters may have fanned the flames that drove them both to America. Priestly complained to a friend in 1788, “It often happens that friends give us more concern than enemies. I now fulfil my promise in sending you Mr Hobson’s letter and my answer. He is a man similar to Mr Palmer but without his learning.”1] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”A Plan for the Education of Youth

Part of the Historical Studies in Education Book Series
Editors: Justice, Benjamin

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References (1)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-44453-3
Pages
243 –249
DOI
10.1057/9781137271020_16
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Academicus was a popular pseudonym in eighteenth-century English and American periodicals, used in connection with educational issues. In this case, Academicus was probably John Hobson, a Unitarian minister from Birmingham, England. Hobson fled Birmingham after the anti-Priestley riots of 1791, in which a mob burned down his church and home. Afterward Priestley and Hobson both left England for America, although it is clear from his absence in Priestley’s correspondence that they were not close, and it is unlikely that they traveled together. In fact, Hobson’s fondness for publishing inflammatory letters may have fanned the flames that drove them both to America. Priestly complained to a friend in 1788, “It often happens that friends give us more concern than enemies. I now fulfil my promise in sending you Mr Hobson’s letter and my answer. He is a man similar to Mr Palmer but without his learning.”1]

Published: Nov 14, 2015

Keywords: Liberal Education; Internal Government; Productive Stock; Proper Standard; Respective District

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