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The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”On Education and Public Schools

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”: On Education and Public Schools [Hiram was Francis Hoskins, which we know beyond a doubt from handwriting comparison. Hoskins was working as a clerk at the Philadelphia Rolls Office (which recorded deeds) in 1797, but by 1802 was listed in the city directory as an accountant. A prolific and eclectic writer whose ambitions outweighed his abilities, Hoskins entered and lost APS contests twice: in 1797 for education (which was ridiculed by the review committee), and in 1800 for navigation. In 1801 Hoskins mailed President Thomas Jefferson a handwritten table that calculated the value of the planet earth if it were made of solid gold, including a separate table that calculated the compound interest on one dollar at 5 percent per annum from 10 to 1,325 years. He did not get a reply.1 Hoskins published at least two books: an undated math textbook he refers to in his essay, entitled An Introduction to Merchandise. Arithmetick. In whole and broken numbers, designed for the use of Academies…, and The Beauties and Super-excellency of Freemasonry Attempted (1801). The latter book reflected the probable origins of his pseudonym: Hiram Abiff was a key figure in Masonic Lore.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”On Education and Public Schools

Part of the Historical Studies in Education Book Series
Editors: Justice, Benjamin

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-44453-3
Pages
239 –241
DOI
10.1057/9781137271020_15
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Hiram was Francis Hoskins, which we know beyond a doubt from handwriting comparison. Hoskins was working as a clerk at the Philadelphia Rolls Office (which recorded deeds) in 1797, but by 1802 was listed in the city directory as an accountant. A prolific and eclectic writer whose ambitions outweighed his abilities, Hoskins entered and lost APS contests twice: in 1797 for education (which was ridiculed by the review committee), and in 1800 for navigation. In 1801 Hoskins mailed President Thomas Jefferson a handwritten table that calculated the value of the planet earth if it were made of solid gold, including a separate table that calculated the compound interest on one dollar at 5 percent per annum from 10 to 1,325 years. He did not get a reply.1 Hoskins published at least two books: an undated math textbook he refers to in his essay, entitled An Introduction to Merchandise. Arithmetick. In whole and broken numbers, designed for the use of Academies…, and The Beauties and Super-excellency of Freemasonry Attempted (1801). The latter book reflected the probable origins of his pseudonym: Hiram Abiff was a key figure in Masonic Lore.]

Published: Nov 14, 2015

Keywords: Public School; Good Scholar; Young Scholar; Probable Origin; Usual Charge

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