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The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”Remarks on Education: Illustrating the Close Connection Between Virtue and Wisdom: To which is Annexed, a System of Liberal Education

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”: Remarks on Education: Illustrating the... [Samuel Harrison Smith (1772–1845) was born to a Philadelphia merchant family and educated in Philadelphia schools, earning a BA (1787) and MA (1790) from the University of Pennsylvania. Ambitious and financially secure, Smith launched a printing business at the age of 19, which included the American Universal Magazine, the New World, and the Independent Gazetteer, which he renamed the Universal Gazette. In recognition of his accomplishments in publishing, the APS elected Smith to membership in 1797 before the announcement of his victory in the essay contest. After the contest, Smith donated his prize winnings to the APS to fund a second contest and became an active member in the organization. In 1800, Smith married his cousin, Margaret Bayard, and moved to Washington, DC at the invitation of Thomas Jefferson to found what would become the mouthpiece of Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party: the triweekly National Intelligencer and Washington Advisor.1] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”Remarks on Education: Illustrating the Close Connection Between Virtue and Wisdom: To which is Annexed, a System of Liberal Education

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-44453-3
Pages
205 –217
DOI
10.1057/9781137271020_12
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Samuel Harrison Smith (1772–1845) was born to a Philadelphia merchant family and educated in Philadelphia schools, earning a BA (1787) and MA (1790) from the University of Pennsylvania. Ambitious and financially secure, Smith launched a printing business at the age of 19, which included the American Universal Magazine, the New World, and the Independent Gazetteer, which he renamed the Universal Gazette. In recognition of his accomplishments in publishing, the APS elected Smith to membership in 1797 before the announcement of his victory in the essay contest. After the contest, Smith donated his prize winnings to the APS to fund a second contest and became an active member in the organization. In 1800, Smith married his cousin, Margaret Bayard, and moved to Washington, DC at the invitation of Thomas Jefferson to found what would become the mouthpiece of Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party: the triweekly National Intelligencer and Washington Advisor.1]

Published: Nov 14, 2015

Keywords: Public Education; Parental Authority; Geographical Knowledge; Human Happiness; Public Expense

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