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The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”Review of Essay No. 3, “A Letter to the American Philosophical Society in Answer to their First Prize Question.”

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”: Review of Essay No. 3, “A Letter to the... [Though we will never know for certain, the author of essay No. 3 was probably William Smith (1727–1803).1 Smith was born near Aberdeen, in the Eastern Highlands of Scotland, to Scottish Episcopal parents. A precocious boy, Smith attended parish and charity schools before attending the University at Aberdeen. He did not complete his degree at that time, but moved to London to work for charity organizations and publish essays, including at least two on education. In 1751 Smith emigrated to America, where his writings caught the attention of Benjamin Franklin, who recruited him to work at his Academy of Philadelphia. Together with Franklin, Smith transformed the Academy into the College and later University of Pennsylvania, serving as provost from 1756 to 1779, and again from 1789 to 1791. (In the decade in between, he served as the first president of Washington College in Maryland, which he hoped would function as the nation’s leading university.) As an educational leader, Smith was a brilliant thinker who encouraged religious toleration and nondenominational ethics. Yet personally he could be quarrelsome and was allegedly overfond of his drink. Politically, his attachment to the Penn family before the revolution, and Loyalist leanings during it, made him many enemies. When the University of Pennsylvania consolidated in 1791, Smith was purposefully excluded.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest”Review of Essay No. 3, “A Letter to the American Philosophical Society in Answer to their First Prize Question.”

Part of the Historical Studies in Education Book Series
Editors: Justice, Benjamin

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-44453-3
Pages
233 –238
DOI
10.1057/9781137271020_14
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Though we will never know for certain, the author of essay No. 3 was probably William Smith (1727–1803).1 Smith was born near Aberdeen, in the Eastern Highlands of Scotland, to Scottish Episcopal parents. A precocious boy, Smith attended parish and charity schools before attending the University at Aberdeen. He did not complete his degree at that time, but moved to London to work for charity organizations and publish essays, including at least two on education. In 1751 Smith emigrated to America, where his writings caught the attention of Benjamin Franklin, who recruited him to work at his Academy of Philadelphia. Together with Franklin, Smith transformed the Academy into the College and later University of Pennsylvania, serving as provost from 1756 to 1779, and again from 1789 to 1791. (In the decade in between, he served as the first president of Washington College in Maryland, which he hoped would function as the nation’s leading university.) As an educational leader, Smith was a brilliant thinker who encouraged religious toleration and nondenominational ethics. Yet personally he could be quarrelsome and was allegedly overfond of his drink. Politically, his attachment to the Penn family before the revolution, and Loyalist leanings during it, made him many enemies. When the University of Pennsylvania consolidated in 1791, Smith was purposefully excluded.]

Published: Nov 14, 2015

Keywords: Primary School; Federal Institution; Educational Leader; National Instruction; Moral Truth

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