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The Laws of LoveSuicide

The Laws of Love: Suicide [It was Hegel I think who remarked that either we love or we die. A stark option, one might well think, a mortal wager, high stakes for the most mundane or corporeally driven of enterprises. Hegel’s reference was to spiritual love and the potential it offers to redeem the soul through caritas or pure desire. We don’t, however, have to agree with Wilhelm Friedrich von H. on the immortal end of love. There is also a more immediate and physical sense in which love promises life in quite literal terms. Consummation is an act of reproduction. It gives birth, it continues, it passes on. At the very least consummation offers the possibility of future life while the failure of love, the defeat of desire, logically entails the opposite of life, the specter of not living on, emptiness, nothingness, death. The old term for the pursuit of love, fin amor or end of love is appropriately ambivalent. It refers to the goal of love, erotic pleasure, fulfillment of desire, but also suggests a terminus, an end, both the “little death” of consummation and the more enduring ending, the demise that stalks, the self-inflicted death that haunts the unrequited lover, the practitioner of distant love and its impossible phantasms of fulfillment.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Laws of LoveSuicide

Part of the Language, Discourse, Society Book Series
The Laws of Love — Sep 30, 2015

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2007
ISBN
978-1-349-28311-8
Pages
169 –180
DOI
10.1057/9780230626539_11
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[It was Hegel I think who remarked that either we love or we die. A stark option, one might well think, a mortal wager, high stakes for the most mundane or corporeally driven of enterprises. Hegel’s reference was to spiritual love and the potential it offers to redeem the soul through caritas or pure desire. We don’t, however, have to agree with Wilhelm Friedrich von H. on the immortal end of love. There is also a more immediate and physical sense in which love promises life in quite literal terms. Consummation is an act of reproduction. It gives birth, it continues, it passes on. At the very least consummation offers the possibility of future life while the failure of love, the defeat of desire, logically entails the opposite of life, the specter of not living on, emptiness, nothingness, death. The old term for the pursuit of love, fin amor or end of love is appropriately ambivalent. It refers to the goal of love, erotic pleasure, fulfillment of desire, but also suggests a terminus, an end, both the “little death” of consummation and the more enduring ending, the demise that stalks, the self-inflicted death that haunts the unrequited lover, the practitioner of distant love and its impossible phantasms of fulfillment.]

Published: Sep 30, 2015

Keywords: Corporal Punishment; Walking Barefoot; Unrequited Lover; Literal Term; Erotic Pleasure

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