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The meaning of death

The meaning of death Cell Death and Differentiation (2002) 9, 347 ± 348 ã 2002 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved 1350-9047/02 $25.00 www.nature.com/cdd Editorial ,1 we would now regard as apoptotic have been made since Gerry Melino* the middle of the 19th century, though their biological IDI-IRCCS, c/o University Tor Vergata, 00133 Rome, Italy. significance has been appreciated only recently. In 1842, * Corresponding author: G Melino; E-mail: gerry.melino@uniroma2.it Vogt recognised a form of physiological cell death, while DOI: 10.1038/sj/cdd/4401001 Flemming, in 1855, used the term `chromatolysis' to describe the nuclear fragmentation seen during cell death ± a characteristic still used, among others, as a hallmark of Albert Camus, following Novalis and Kierkegard, puts suicide apoptosis. Other similar descriptions occurred occasionally at the centre of thinking. Since over 2% of all 650 000 papers in the XIXth and early XXth centuries. More recently, the published annually in the life sciences are related to embryologist Gluckmann (1951), the haematologist Bessis apoptosis, it would seem that biology has also entered an (1955), and the biologist Tata (1960) clearly described the 1,2 existentialist phase. morphological phases of apoptosis. In the 1960s, working It is the balance between cell choices (mitosis, on insect development, Lockshin recognised http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cell Death & Differentiation Springer Journals

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References (12)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Macmillan Publishers Limited
Subject
Life Sciences; Life Sciences, general; Biochemistry, general; Cell Biology; Stem Cells; Apoptosis; Cell Cycle Analysis
ISSN
1350-9047
eISSN
1476-5403
DOI
10.1038/sj.cdd.4401001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cell Death and Differentiation (2002) 9, 347 ± 348 ã 2002 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved 1350-9047/02 $25.00 www.nature.com/cdd Editorial ,1 we would now regard as apoptotic have been made since Gerry Melino* the middle of the 19th century, though their biological IDI-IRCCS, c/o University Tor Vergata, 00133 Rome, Italy. significance has been appreciated only recently. In 1842, * Corresponding author: G Melino; E-mail: gerry.melino@uniroma2.it Vogt recognised a form of physiological cell death, while DOI: 10.1038/sj/cdd/4401001 Flemming, in 1855, used the term `chromatolysis' to describe the nuclear fragmentation seen during cell death ± a characteristic still used, among others, as a hallmark of Albert Camus, following Novalis and Kierkegard, puts suicide apoptosis. Other similar descriptions occurred occasionally at the centre of thinking. Since over 2% of all 650 000 papers in the XIXth and early XXth centuries. More recently, the published annually in the life sciences are related to embryologist Gluckmann (1951), the haematologist Bessis apoptosis, it would seem that biology has also entered an (1955), and the biologist Tata (1960) clearly described the 1,2 existentialist phase. morphological phases of apoptosis. In the 1960s, working It is the balance between cell choices (mitosis, on insect development, Lockshin recognised

Journal

Cell Death & DifferentiationSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 28, 2002

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