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The Moral Economy of Heroin in ‘Austerity Britain’

The Moral Economy of Heroin in ‘Austerity Britain’ This article presents the findings of an ethnographic exploration of heroin use in a disadvantaged area of the United Kingdom. Drawing on developments in continental philosophy as well as debates around the nature of social exclusion in the late-modern west, the core claim made here is that the cultural systems of exchange and mutual support which have come to underpin heroin use in this locale—that, taken together, form a ‘moral economy of heroin’—need to be understood as an exercise in reconstituting a meaningful social realm by, and specifically for, this highly marginalised group. The implications of this claim are discussed as they pertain to the fields of drug policy, addiction treatment, and critical criminological understandings of disenfranchised groups. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Critical Criminology Springer Journals

The Moral Economy of Heroin in ‘Austerity Britain’

Critical Criminology , Volume 24 (3) – Dec 18, 2015

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References (65)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by The Author(s)
Subject
Social Sciences; Criminology & Criminal Justice
ISSN
1205-8629
eISSN
1572-9877
DOI
10.1007/s10612-015-9312-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article presents the findings of an ethnographic exploration of heroin use in a disadvantaged area of the United Kingdom. Drawing on developments in continental philosophy as well as debates around the nature of social exclusion in the late-modern west, the core claim made here is that the cultural systems of exchange and mutual support which have come to underpin heroin use in this locale—that, taken together, form a ‘moral economy of heroin’—need to be understood as an exercise in reconstituting a meaningful social realm by, and specifically for, this highly marginalised group. The implications of this claim are discussed as they pertain to the fields of drug policy, addiction treatment, and critical criminological understandings of disenfranchised groups.

Journal

Critical CriminologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 18, 2015

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