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The Pursuit of Human Well-BeingWell-Being in the Transition Economies of the Successor States of the Former Soviet Union: The Challenges of Change

The Pursuit of Human Well-Being: Well-Being in the Transition Economies of the Successor States... [With the fall of the Berlin Wall, the countries of the former Eastern bloc, which include countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and those of the former Soviet Union, experienced turbulent economic, political, and institutional changes that were a remarkable departure from socialism. Steep drops in life satisfaction levels reflected the large drops in gross national product associated with the transition and the erosion of key social welfare mechanisms. Life satisfaction levels gradually recovered along with economic growth and stability. Income inequality and inequality in life satisfaction both increased. Yet it is difficult to generalize about such a diverse set of countries; they entered the transition with very different initial conditions and emerged from it with various degrees of success. Those countries with historical links to Europe fared the best. Those countries that were closer to the Soviet empire had less complete transitions and larger increases in inequality, and life satisfaction levels dropped more and recovered less. The outlying countries in Central Asia emerged from the transition with the dual challenges of underdevelopment and the shift from central planning. The transition provided major opportunities for change—including economic and political freedom—for the countries (and cohorts within them) that were positioned to take advantage of them. Younger people who were better equipped to adapt to new economic and political systems, such as those with more skills and education, were the clear “winners” in the process. This fact is reflected in their life satisfaction, their satisfaction with political and economic regimes, and their faith in the system in general. The transition widened preexisting differences among countries, both in terms of economic and institutional indicators and in terms of life satisfaction and individuals’ perceptions of their future opportunities. A major challenge for policy is crafting new mechanisms to facilitate the participation of those individuals who have fallen behind.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The Pursuit of Human Well-BeingWell-Being in the Transition Economies of the Successor States of the Former Soviet Union: The Challenges of Change

Editors: Estes, Richard J.; Sirgy, M. Joseph

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References (36)

Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017
ISBN
978-3-319-39100-7
Pages
493 –521
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-39101-4_15
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[With the fall of the Berlin Wall, the countries of the former Eastern bloc, which include countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and those of the former Soviet Union, experienced turbulent economic, political, and institutional changes that were a remarkable departure from socialism. Steep drops in life satisfaction levels reflected the large drops in gross national product associated with the transition and the erosion of key social welfare mechanisms. Life satisfaction levels gradually recovered along with economic growth and stability. Income inequality and inequality in life satisfaction both increased. Yet it is difficult to generalize about such a diverse set of countries; they entered the transition with very different initial conditions and emerged from it with various degrees of success. Those countries with historical links to Europe fared the best. Those countries that were closer to the Soviet empire had less complete transitions and larger increases in inequality, and life satisfaction levels dropped more and recovered less. The outlying countries in Central Asia emerged from the transition with the dual challenges of underdevelopment and the shift from central planning. The transition provided major opportunities for change—including economic and political freedom—for the countries (and cohorts within them) that were positioned to take advantage of them. Younger people who were better equipped to adapt to new economic and political systems, such as those with more skills and education, were the clear “winners” in the process. This fact is reflected in their life satisfaction, their satisfaction with political and economic regimes, and their faith in the system in general. The transition widened preexisting differences among countries, both in terms of economic and institutional indicators and in terms of life satisfaction and individuals’ perceptions of their future opportunities. A major challenge for policy is crafting new mechanisms to facilitate the participation of those individuals who have fallen behind.]

Published: Jan 11, 2017

Keywords: Subjective well-being; Transition economies; Path dependence

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