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The Sibsize Revolution and Social Disparities in Children’s Family Contexts in the United States, 1940–2012

The Sibsize Revolution and Social Disparities in Children’s Family Contexts in the United States,... This article points to a sharp decline in children’s sibling numbers (sibsize) that occurred in the United States since the 1970s and was large enough among children with lower socioeconomic status (SES) (particularly black children) to amount to a revolution in their family circumstances. It interprets sibsize decline as a source of social convergence in children’s family contexts that ran counter to trends toward social divergence caused by the rise of lone parenthood. The article is based on new estimates of differences in children’s sibsize and lone parenthood by race and maternal education generated from public-use samples from the Census of Population and Current Population Survey (CPS), focusing especially on the period 1940–2012. I discuss some methodological and substantive challenges for existing scholarship arising from the findings and point to questions for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Demography Springer Journals

The Sibsize Revolution and Social Disparities in Children’s Family Contexts in the United States, 1940–2012

Demography , Volume 54 (3) – Apr 11, 2017

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References (79)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Population Association of America
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics; Medicine/Public Health, general; Geography, general
ISSN
0070-3370
eISSN
1533-7790
DOI
10.1007/s13524-017-0568-0
pmid
28401501
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article points to a sharp decline in children’s sibling numbers (sibsize) that occurred in the United States since the 1970s and was large enough among children with lower socioeconomic status (SES) (particularly black children) to amount to a revolution in their family circumstances. It interprets sibsize decline as a source of social convergence in children’s family contexts that ran counter to trends toward social divergence caused by the rise of lone parenthood. The article is based on new estimates of differences in children’s sibsize and lone parenthood by race and maternal education generated from public-use samples from the Census of Population and Current Population Survey (CPS), focusing especially on the period 1940–2012. I discuss some methodological and substantive challenges for existing scholarship arising from the findings and point to questions for future research.

Journal

DemographySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 11, 2017

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