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The state of social capital: Bringing back in power, politics, and history

The state of social capital: Bringing back in power, politics, and history The state of social capital: Bringing back in power, politics, and history SIMON SZRETER St.John’sCollege,Cambridge I think the Weimar Republic collapsed and the Nazis took over in 1933 because there were not enough citizens. That is the lesson I have learned. Citizens cannot leave politics just to politicians. GunterGrass The concept of social capital has already generated a wide range of stimulating debates in a burgeoning literature that spans the full range of the social and medical sciences. In the concept’s short life so far, the two most in£uential and substantial empirical studies have both been produced by Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam. Put- nam’s books have each o¡ered strong theses about patterns of varia- tion in social capital over time and space; and they have certainly succeeded in stoking up enormous interest in exploring the potential importance of such variation for the political, economic, and even biological health of nations and states. However, despite Putnam’s explicitly historical perspective in both books, one of the central per- plexing debates remains the question of exactly how and why (under what circumstances) social capital increases or decreases. What are the principal causes of its waxing and waning over time? This article http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Theory and Society Springer Journals

The state of social capital: Bringing back in power, politics, and history

Theory and Society , Volume 31 (5) – Oct 18, 2004

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References (27)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Sociology, general; Philosophy of the Social Sciences
ISSN
0304-2421
eISSN
1573-7853
DOI
10.1023/A:1021300217590
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The state of social capital: Bringing back in power, politics, and history SIMON SZRETER St.John’sCollege,Cambridge I think the Weimar Republic collapsed and the Nazis took over in 1933 because there were not enough citizens. That is the lesson I have learned. Citizens cannot leave politics just to politicians. GunterGrass The concept of social capital has already generated a wide range of stimulating debates in a burgeoning literature that spans the full range of the social and medical sciences. In the concept’s short life so far, the two most in£uential and substantial empirical studies have both been produced by Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam. Put- nam’s books have each o¡ered strong theses about patterns of varia- tion in social capital over time and space; and they have certainly succeeded in stoking up enormous interest in exploring the potential importance of such variation for the political, economic, and even biological health of nations and states. However, despite Putnam’s explicitly historical perspective in both books, one of the central per- plexing debates remains the question of exactly how and why (under what circumstances) social capital increases or decreases. What are the principal causes of its waxing and waning over time? This article

Journal

Theory and SocietySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 18, 2004

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