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Understanding diversity and differentiation in higher education: an overview

Understanding diversity and differentiation in higher education: an overview Higher Education Policy 13 (2000) 1±6 www.elsevier.com/locate/highedpol Editorial Understanding diversity and di€erentiation in higher education: an overview Diversity, it is claimed, a€ects nearly every aspect of higher education: access and equity, teaching methods and student learning, research priorities, quality, management, social relevance, ®nance, etc. Stadtman (1980), for example, states that diversity: . increases the range of choices available to learners; . makes higher education available to virtually everyone; . matches education to the needs and abilities of individual students; . enables institutions to select their own mission and con®ne their activities; . responds to the pressures of a society (complex and diversi®ed in itself); and . becomes a precondition of college and university freedom and autonomy. With the continual expansion of higher education following the second world war, the issue of diversity has been a recurrent theme in debates on the steering and management of higher education institutions and systems. But the debate has resolved neither how diversity is to be achieved, whether or not it is an inevitable result of expansion, nor even if it is a worthwhile goal. Responses to the issue by di€erent national systems vary widely. Much of the writing on higher education in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Higher Education Policy Springer Journals

Understanding diversity and differentiation in higher education: an overview

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References (1)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by International Association of Universities
Subject
Education; Education, general; Educational Policy and Politics; Higher Education; Education Policy
ISSN
0952-8733
eISSN
1740-3863
DOI
10.1016/S0952-8733(99)00032-X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Higher Education Policy 13 (2000) 1±6 www.elsevier.com/locate/highedpol Editorial Understanding diversity and di€erentiation in higher education: an overview Diversity, it is claimed, a€ects nearly every aspect of higher education: access and equity, teaching methods and student learning, research priorities, quality, management, social relevance, ®nance, etc. Stadtman (1980), for example, states that diversity: . increases the range of choices available to learners; . makes higher education available to virtually everyone; . matches education to the needs and abilities of individual students; . enables institutions to select their own mission and con®ne their activities; . responds to the pressures of a society (complex and diversi®ed in itself); and . becomes a precondition of college and university freedom and autonomy. With the continual expansion of higher education following the second world war, the issue of diversity has been a recurrent theme in debates on the steering and management of higher education institutions and systems. But the debate has resolved neither how diversity is to be achieved, whether or not it is an inevitable result of expansion, nor even if it is a worthwhile goal. Responses to the issue by di€erent national systems vary widely. Much of the writing on higher education in the

Journal

Higher Education PolicySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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