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University GovernanceUnited Kingdom from Bureau Professionalism to New Public Management?

University Governance: United Kingdom from Bureau Professionalism to New Public Management? [UK Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) exhibit strong ideologies of autonomy and retain important sources of institutional autonomy when compared with other HE systems. UK HEIs hold Statutes from a non party political body (technically known as the Privy Council), which guarantees their institutional rights. Universities have internal control over faculty appointments and academics are not civil servants. Universities are not part of the Ministry of Education, although steered by it. Traditionally, the UK HE system has been steered indirectly through ‘buffer’ agencies as it was not a political priority for intervention (compared with, say, schools and hospitals) and the doctrine of academic freedom was respected in the policy arena. It is commonly argued within the sector that it is ‘special’, insulated from outside macro forces and shaped by traditional internal and academically led dynamics. But is this pattern badly dated? Has the sector undergone progressive managerialisation since the 1980s? This national case study argues that powerful outside forces – including public sector wide reform strategies – have shaped the UK HE system over the last 30 years. We argue that these reforms have had more than the superficial impact often predicted.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

University GovernanceUnited Kingdom from Bureau Professionalism to New Public Management?

Part of the Higher Education Dynamics Book Series (volume 25)
Editors: Paradeise, Catherine; Reale, Emanuela; Bleiklie, Ivar; Ferlie, Ewan
University Governance — Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Netherlands 2009
ISBN
978-1-4020-8637-3
Pages
177 –195
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4020-9515-3_8
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[UK Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) exhibit strong ideologies of autonomy and retain important sources of institutional autonomy when compared with other HE systems. UK HEIs hold Statutes from a non party political body (technically known as the Privy Council), which guarantees their institutional rights. Universities have internal control over faculty appointments and academics are not civil servants. Universities are not part of the Ministry of Education, although steered by it. Traditionally, the UK HE system has been steered indirectly through ‘buffer’ agencies as it was not a political priority for intervention (compared with, say, schools and hospitals) and the doctrine of academic freedom was respected in the policy arena. It is commonly argued within the sector that it is ‘special’, insulated from outside macro forces and shaped by traditional internal and academically led dynamics. But is this pattern badly dated? Has the sector undergone progressive managerialisation since the 1980s? This national case study argues that powerful outside forces – including public sector wide reform strategies – have shaped the UK HE system over the last 30 years. We argue that these reforms have had more than the superficial impact often predicted.]

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: Public Management; Network Governance; Doctoral Training; Fund Council; Private Finance Initiative

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