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Using Shaping to Teach Eye Contact to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Using Shaping to Teach Eye Contact to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder The current study used a shaping procedure to teach three preschool-aged children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder to make eye contact with the instructor for a duration of 3 s. Then, eye contact was taught during breaks in instruction. Following the initial intervention, the frequency of reinforcement was decreased while training for generalization across instructors and locations. All three children acquired quick and sustained eye contact, which maintained after 1 month without the need for prompting. This study provides an alternative method for teaching young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder to make eye contact without the need for prompting; outlines an approach for teaching eye contact when baseline levels of eye contact are severely low and/or the child is actively avoiding eye contact; describes a successful method for thinning the schedule of reinforcement and introducing instructional demands; and recommends a practical technique for gaining attention before delivering an instructional demand. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavior Analysis in Practice Springer Journals

Using Shaping to Teach Eye Contact to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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References (10)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Association for Behavior Analysis International
Subject
Psychology; Psychology, general
ISSN
1998-1929
eISSN
2196-8934
DOI
10.1007/s40617-018-0245-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The current study used a shaping procedure to teach three preschool-aged children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder to make eye contact with the instructor for a duration of 3 s. Then, eye contact was taught during breaks in instruction. Following the initial intervention, the frequency of reinforcement was decreased while training for generalization across instructors and locations. All three children acquired quick and sustained eye contact, which maintained after 1 month without the need for prompting. This study provides an alternative method for teaching young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder to make eye contact without the need for prompting; outlines an approach for teaching eye contact when baseline levels of eye contact are severely low and/or the child is actively avoiding eye contact; describes a successful method for thinning the schedule of reinforcement and introducing instructional demands; and recommends a practical technique for gaining attention before delivering an instructional demand.

Journal

Behavior Analysis in PracticeSpringer Journals

Published: May 25, 2018

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