Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Victims of violence: Psychological effects and aftereffects

Victims of violence: Psychological effects and aftereffects THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS 35:19-26 (1975) VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE: PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND AFTEREFFECTS Martin Symonds Literature on violent crime generally focuses on the criminal or the criminal act. It has been only in recent years that professional attention has been given to the third element of violent crime - the victim. Studies of victims have, however, emphasized the participant aspects of the victim's behavior, x-3 A newly developed field of study of victims and their behavior called victomology seems to place undue emphasis on victim-stimulated or victim-precipitated crimes. Sociologists and lawyers seem to pre- dominate in this field, and they continue to assert the concept of victim-precipitated criminality through propinquity, temptation, opportunity, 4 and self-destructiveness. Some psychiatrists s have proposed the concept of victim-stimulated crimes particularly in those acts of murder where the victim and criminal usually have a prior association. B. Mendelson, an outstanding leader in the study of victimology and one who is considered the grandfather of this field, in a recent article still focused on the con- tribution of the victim to his own suffering. 6 In a development of factors leading to causality, Mendelson regards as the first factor the "No-psychological endogenous environment of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

Victims of violence: Psychological effects and aftereffects

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis , Volume 35 (1): 8 – Mar 1, 1975

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/victims-of-violence-psychological-effects-and-aftereffects-3YyVQERuAS

References (11)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1975 APS Publications, Inc.
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/BF01248422
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS 35:19-26 (1975) VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE: PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND AFTEREFFECTS Martin Symonds Literature on violent crime generally focuses on the criminal or the criminal act. It has been only in recent years that professional attention has been given to the third element of violent crime - the victim. Studies of victims have, however, emphasized the participant aspects of the victim's behavior, x-3 A newly developed field of study of victims and their behavior called victomology seems to place undue emphasis on victim-stimulated or victim-precipitated crimes. Sociologists and lawyers seem to pre- dominate in this field, and they continue to assert the concept of victim-precipitated criminality through propinquity, temptation, opportunity, 4 and self-destructiveness. Some psychiatrists s have proposed the concept of victim-stimulated crimes particularly in those acts of murder where the victim and criminal usually have a prior association. B. Mendelson, an outstanding leader in the study of victimology and one who is considered the grandfather of this field, in a recent article still focused on the con- tribution of the victim to his own suffering. 6 In a development of factors leading to causality, Mendelson regards as the first factor the "No-psychological endogenous environment of

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1975

Keywords: Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis

There are no references for this article.