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William Gilbert of Colchester, Physician of London, on the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies, and on the Great Magnet the Earth A New Physiology, Demonstrated with Many Arguments and Experiments

William Gilbert of Colchester, Physician of London, on the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies, and on... AMONG men of science there is no difference of opinion as to the value of the original Latin work, “De Magnete,” of which this is a translation. Some time ago (NATURE, vol. xlii. p. 279) we gave an account of a meeting held at Colchester by members of the Essex Field Club and the Gilbert Club, for the purpose of doing honour to the memory of Gilbert, who was born there in 1540. In a speech delivered at this festival Lord Rayleigh not only spoke highly of Gilbert's work, but went on to say that although we owe to an investigator who lived so long ago the theory that the earth is a great magnet, we are not much in advance of that position at the present time, as nobody has yet explained the origin of terrestrial magnetism. It was most desirable that a work which may be said to have marked a definite stage in the evolution of physical science should be presented in an English form, and this has now been done by an American scholar, who, as he himself explains, has “translated with latitude, keeping in view the author's sense more particularly than his words, and amplifying without altering the former.” Mr. Mottelay has also brought together in a short biographical memoir the leading facts relating to Gilbert's career. The volume is well printed on good paper, and will be very welcome to students of the history of scientific ideas. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Springer Journals

William Gilbert of Colchester, Physician of London, on the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies, and on the Great Magnet the Earth A New Physiology, Demonstrated with Many Arguments and Experiments

Nature , Volume 47 (1224) – Apr 13, 1893

William Gilbert of Colchester, Physician of London, on the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies, and on the Great Magnet the Earth A New Physiology, Demonstrated with Many Arguments and Experiments

Abstract

AMONG men of science there is no difference of opinion as to the value of the original Latin work, “De Magnete,” of which this is a translation. Some time ago (NATURE, vol. xlii. p. 279) we gave an account of a meeting held at Colchester by members of the Essex Field Club and the Gilbert Club, for the purpose of doing honour to the memory of Gilbert, who was born there in 1540. In a speech delivered at this festival Lord Rayleigh not only spoke highly of Gilbert's work, but...
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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1893 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
DOI
10.1038/047556a0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AMONG men of science there is no difference of opinion as to the value of the original Latin work, “De Magnete,” of which this is a translation. Some time ago (NATURE, vol. xlii. p. 279) we gave an account of a meeting held at Colchester by members of the Essex Field Club and the Gilbert Club, for the purpose of doing honour to the memory of Gilbert, who was born there in 1540. In a speech delivered at this festival Lord Rayleigh not only spoke highly of Gilbert's work, but went on to say that although we owe to an investigator who lived so long ago the theory that the earth is a great magnet, we are not much in advance of that position at the present time, as nobody has yet explained the origin of terrestrial magnetism. It was most desirable that a work which may be said to have marked a definite stage in the evolution of physical science should be presented in an English form, and this has now been done by an American scholar, who, as he himself explains, has “translated with latitude, keeping in view the author's sense more particularly than his words, and amplifying without altering the former.” Mr. Mottelay has also brought together in a short biographical memoir the leading facts relating to Gilbert's career. The volume is well printed on good paper, and will be very welcome to students of the history of scientific ideas.

Journal

NatureSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 13, 1893

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