Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A case study of the lasting impacts of employment in a development through sport, recreation and the arts programme for Aboriginal youth

A case study of the lasting impacts of employment in a development through sport, recreation and... AbstractIn this article, we explore if/how working for Alberta’s Future Leaders Program (AFL) in Alberta, Canada, had a lasting impact on former employees. Based on interviews with 15 youth workers and one arts mentor, we found the following: (1) by being involved in AFL, the staff members increased their awareness of racism’s and colonialism’s impacts; (2) they learned to challenge stereotypes; and (3) they gained a strong employment trajectory. As a result, they (4) believed that they reaped more benefits from AFL involvement than the programme’s intended beneficiaries. While these findings are troubling in that relatively privileged people may be the programme’s main beneficiaries, which serves to reaffirm and reinforce their privilege, they also show that domestic sport for development programmes can sensitize both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal employees to issues pertaining to racism and colonialism, they have the potential to develop ‘allies’ and also to yield outcomes similar to involvement in international sport for development programmes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sport in Society Taylor & Francis

A case study of the lasting impacts of employment in a development through sport, recreation and the arts programme for Aboriginal youth

Sport in Society , Volume 19 (2): 15 – Feb 7, 2016
15 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/a-case-study-of-the-lasting-impacts-of-employment-in-a-development-ilrk0GRopD

References (46)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1743-0445
eISSN
1743-0437
DOI
10.1080/17430437.2015.1067770
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn this article, we explore if/how working for Alberta’s Future Leaders Program (AFL) in Alberta, Canada, had a lasting impact on former employees. Based on interviews with 15 youth workers and one arts mentor, we found the following: (1) by being involved in AFL, the staff members increased their awareness of racism’s and colonialism’s impacts; (2) they learned to challenge stereotypes; and (3) they gained a strong employment trajectory. As a result, they (4) believed that they reaped more benefits from AFL involvement than the programme’s intended beneficiaries. While these findings are troubling in that relatively privileged people may be the programme’s main beneficiaries, which serves to reaffirm and reinforce their privilege, they also show that domestic sport for development programmes can sensitize both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal employees to issues pertaining to racism and colonialism, they have the potential to develop ‘allies’ and also to yield outcomes similar to involvement in international sport for development programmes.

Journal

Sport in SocietyTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 7, 2016

There are no references for this article.