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A review of the granators’ accounts of Durham Cathedral Priory 1294–1433: an early example of process accounting?

A review of the granators’ accounts of Durham Cathedral Priory 1294–1433: an early example of... No transcripts from the accounts of the granator, a monk-official entrusted with the administration of grain1 of Durham Cathedral Priory during the period covered by this paper (1294–1433) have hitherto been published. The accounting records which survive from his office comprise a particularly interesting series of linked accounts, which extend far beyond simple grain accounts to include accounts for wheat, bread-making, bread-usage, barley, malt, brewing and ale consumption. Flows are traceable from one account to another in a form of process accounting2 which also takes note of expected yields from specified processes and generates average usage figures calculated by month and week. These accounts are of particular interest as they reveal practices which move beyond the stewardship emphasis traditionally perceived by accounting historians as the dominant feature of medieval charge and discharge accounts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Accounting History Review Taylor & Francis

A review of the granators’ accounts of Durham Cathedral Priory 1294–1433: an early example of process accounting?

Accounting History Review , Volume 21 (1): 29 – Mar 1, 2011
29 pages

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References (63)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4275
eISSN
0958-5206
DOI
10.1080/21552851.2011.548178
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

No transcripts from the accounts of the granator, a monk-official entrusted with the administration of grain1 of Durham Cathedral Priory during the period covered by this paper (1294–1433) have hitherto been published. The accounting records which survive from his office comprise a particularly interesting series of linked accounts, which extend far beyond simple grain accounts to include accounts for wheat, bread-making, bread-usage, barley, malt, brewing and ale consumption. Flows are traceable from one account to another in a form of process accounting2 which also takes note of expected yields from specified processes and generates average usage figures calculated by month and week. These accounts are of particular interest as they reveal practices which move beyond the stewardship emphasis traditionally perceived by accounting historians as the dominant feature of medieval charge and discharge accounts.

Journal

Accounting History ReviewTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2011

Keywords: history of accounting; medieval monastic estates; process accounting

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