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Aesthetic Education: Its Place in Teacher Training

Aesthetic Education: Its Place in Teacher Training Teacher training based on the Lincoln Center Institute model for aesthetic education demonstrates that preservice early childhood and elementary educators value the arts in their communities when fine arts curriculum engages them in explorations of art, music, and dance. esthetic Education: Its Place in Teacher Training f we desire future early childhood and elementary teachers to expose their students to the arts in purposeful, meaningful, Iand lasting ways, it is only sensible to consider that they them- TIM o TH Y J . FR A WLEY selves would first need to engage in the arts on a personal level. Yet too often this expectation is overlooked. When exploring the issue of overhauling teacher education, Fowler (1996) notes that “There is nothing that makes elementary teachers more insecure than having to teach something they know little or nothing about… The discomfort of having to teach what one does not know leads to timidity, avoidance, and ultimately ineptitude” (p. 170). While it would be egregious not to acknowledge the dire state doing—interpreting, manipulating, analyzing, reflecting—not in and looming removal of art and music programs in many of our isolation, but in contact with others. schools today, it is equally important to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Art Education Taylor & Francis

Aesthetic Education: Its Place in Teacher Training

Art Education , Volume 66 (3): 7 – May 1, 2013
7 pages

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References (2)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© National Art Education Association 2013
ISSN
2325-5161
eISSN
0004-3125
DOI
10.1080/00043125.2013.11519220
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Teacher training based on the Lincoln Center Institute model for aesthetic education demonstrates that preservice early childhood and elementary educators value the arts in their communities when fine arts curriculum engages them in explorations of art, music, and dance. esthetic Education: Its Place in Teacher Training f we desire future early childhood and elementary teachers to expose their students to the arts in purposeful, meaningful, Iand lasting ways, it is only sensible to consider that they them- TIM o TH Y J . FR A WLEY selves would first need to engage in the arts on a personal level. Yet too often this expectation is overlooked. When exploring the issue of overhauling teacher education, Fowler (1996) notes that “There is nothing that makes elementary teachers more insecure than having to teach something they know little or nothing about… The discomfort of having to teach what one does not know leads to timidity, avoidance, and ultimately ineptitude” (p. 170). While it would be egregious not to acknowledge the dire state doing—interpreting, manipulating, analyzing, reflecting—not in and looming removal of art and music programs in many of our isolation, but in contact with others. schools today, it is equally important to

Journal

Art EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 2013

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