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Agency and Accountability: Promoting Women's Participation in Peacebuilding

Agency and Accountability: Promoting Women's Participation in Peacebuilding This contribution reviews international policy and practices to engage women in formal peace talks, post-conflict elections, and economic recovery, and finds a combination of factors contributing to poor performance in promoting women's agency. The fact that the privileged category for post-conflict decisions are those groups capable of acting as “spoilers” has tended to exclude women's groups from the categories considered most important to involve in decision making. Exacerbating this exclusion is the reluctance of international decision makers to encourage affirmative action measures in these contexts. This carries through to the minimal-state approach to economic recovery efforts. Provisions are needed to foster and invite women's voice in decision making, and build more active-state approaches to women's livelihood recovery. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Feminist Economics Taylor & Francis

Agency and Accountability: Promoting Women's Participation in Peacebuilding

Feminist Economics , Volume 22 (1): 26 – Jan 2, 2016
26 pages

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References (50)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 IAFFE
ISSN
1466-4372
eISSN
1354-5701
DOI
10.1080/13545701.2015.1086012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This contribution reviews international policy and practices to engage women in formal peace talks, post-conflict elections, and economic recovery, and finds a combination of factors contributing to poor performance in promoting women's agency. The fact that the privileged category for post-conflict decisions are those groups capable of acting as “spoilers” has tended to exclude women's groups from the categories considered most important to involve in decision making. Exacerbating this exclusion is the reluctance of international decision makers to encourage affirmative action measures in these contexts. This carries through to the minimal-state approach to economic recovery efforts. Provisions are needed to foster and invite women's voice in decision making, and build more active-state approaches to women's livelihood recovery.

Journal

Feminist EconomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2016

Keywords: Affirmative action; agency; community; development; discrimination; interdisciplinary; D73; D74

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