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angels, bandidos, outlaws, and pagans: the evolution of organized crime among the big four 1% motorcycle clubs

angels, bandidos, outlaws, and pagans: the evolution of organized crime among the big four 1%... This paper outlines the evolution of the Big Four one percent motorcycle clubs?Hell's Angels, Bandidos, Outlaws, and Pagans?from near-groups to well-organized criminal confederations. The insights of criminological theory unify a variety of journalistic and scientific sources into a holistic picture of the development of these organizations. The interaction of members' psychological needs with group dynamics and mainstream social forces lead to periods of expansion as core values shift to emphasize dominance over rivals. The resulting interclub tensions encourage the creation of organized criminal enterprises but also attract police attention. Internecine rivalries were eventually subordinated to these enterprises as their profit potential was recognized and intergroup warfare took its toll. Core biker values were reasserted as certain aspects of club operation became less countercultural in order to assure the future of the subculture and its basic components. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Deviant Behavior Taylor & Francis

angels, bandidos, outlaws, and pagans: the evolution of organized crime among the big four 1% motorcycle clubs

Deviant Behavior , Volume 22 (4): 21 – Jul 1, 2001
21 pages

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References (55)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1521-0456
eISSN
0163-9625
DOI
10.1080/016396201750267870
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper outlines the evolution of the Big Four one percent motorcycle clubs?Hell's Angels, Bandidos, Outlaws, and Pagans?from near-groups to well-organized criminal confederations. The insights of criminological theory unify a variety of journalistic and scientific sources into a holistic picture of the development of these organizations. The interaction of members' psychological needs with group dynamics and mainstream social forces lead to periods of expansion as core values shift to emphasize dominance over rivals. The resulting interclub tensions encourage the creation of organized criminal enterprises but also attract police attention. Internecine rivalries were eventually subordinated to these enterprises as their profit potential was recognized and intergroup warfare took its toll. Core biker values were reasserted as certain aspects of club operation became less countercultural in order to assure the future of the subculture and its basic components.

Journal

Deviant BehaviorTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2001

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