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Arming America: The Origins of a National Gun Culture

Arming America: The Origins of a National Gun Culture for the colonial period but right up to the Civil their desire for free trade to promote growth Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and Elbridge and opportunity. Middling traders played a key Gerry, to negotiate an end to the Quasi-War, a War. Ironically, throughout the same period, role as advocates of free trade, but their ambi- topic to which Robarge devotes a brief chap- the government-whether the British Parlia- ment, the colonial governments, or the feder- tions were often frustrated by elite merchants ter. The delegation’s refusal to accede to a who benefited from a mercantilist approach. French demand for a bribe to begin negotia- al govemment-continually tried to create an Matson cautions that competing interests tions made Marshall something of a national armed citizenry in the form of militias. For a did not always pit large international business- hero and led to his election to Congress in variety of reasons, ranging from economic to men against their smaller, more provincial 1798. In 1800, Adam appointed the loyal romantic, those governments remained counterparts. Merchants borrowed selectively Marshall as secretary of state, and a year later strongly committed to the idea of militias. from mercantilist and free-trade ideas when it made him http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History: Reviews of New Books Taylor & Francis

Arming America: The Origins of a National Gun Culture

History: Reviews of New Books , Volume 28 (4): 1 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1930-8280
eISSN
0361-2759
DOI
10.1080/03612759.2000.10525554
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

for the colonial period but right up to the Civil their desire for free trade to promote growth Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and Elbridge and opportunity. Middling traders played a key Gerry, to negotiate an end to the Quasi-War, a War. Ironically, throughout the same period, role as advocates of free trade, but their ambi- topic to which Robarge devotes a brief chap- the government-whether the British Parlia- ment, the colonial governments, or the feder- tions were often frustrated by elite merchants ter. The delegation’s refusal to accede to a who benefited from a mercantilist approach. French demand for a bribe to begin negotia- al govemment-continually tried to create an Matson cautions that competing interests tions made Marshall something of a national armed citizenry in the form of militias. For a did not always pit large international business- hero and led to his election to Congress in variety of reasons, ranging from economic to men against their smaller, more provincial 1798. In 1800, Adam appointed the loyal romantic, those governments remained counterparts. Merchants borrowed selectively Marshall as secretary of state, and a year later strongly committed to the idea of militias. from mercantilist and free-trade ideas when it made him

Journal

History: Reviews of New BooksTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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