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Availability of family support as a moderator of exposure to community violence

Availability of family support as a moderator of exposure to community violence Examined the role of availability of family support in moderating the negative effects of exposure to community violence on internalizing symptoms. Participants were 75 low-income African American children between the ages of 10 and 15. Two measures of availability of family support (mother's presence in the home and family size) were evaluated as moderators of the relations between exposure to community violence and depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. After controlling for age, sex, and concurrent life stress, mother's presence in the home moderated the relation between exposure to community violence and depressive symptoms but not the relation between exposure to community violence and PTSD symptoms. Children living in mother-absent families were at increased risk of depressive symptoms as exposure to community violence increased. In addition, family size approached significance as a moderator of depressive symptoms but not PTSD symptoms, revealing a trend toward children from smaller families being at increased risk of depressive symptoms as exposure to community violence increased. These findings suggest that although availability of family support is an important moderator for depressive symptoms, this is not the case for PTSD symptoms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Child Psychology Taylor & Francis

Availability of family support as a moderator of exposure to community violence

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References (32)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
0047-228X
DOI
10.1207/s15374424jccp2802_3
pmid
10353075
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Examined the role of availability of family support in moderating the negative effects of exposure to community violence on internalizing symptoms. Participants were 75 low-income African American children between the ages of 10 and 15. Two measures of availability of family support (mother's presence in the home and family size) were evaluated as moderators of the relations between exposure to community violence and depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. After controlling for age, sex, and concurrent life stress, mother's presence in the home moderated the relation between exposure to community violence and depressive symptoms but not the relation between exposure to community violence and PTSD symptoms. Children living in mother-absent families were at increased risk of depressive symptoms as exposure to community violence increased. In addition, family size approached significance as a moderator of depressive symptoms but not PTSD symptoms, revealing a trend toward children from smaller families being at increased risk of depressive symptoms as exposure to community violence increased. These findings suggest that although availability of family support is an important moderator for depressive symptoms, this is not the case for PTSD symptoms.

Journal

Journal of Clinical Child PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 1999

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