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book review

book review Economic aspects of adaptation to climate change: Costs, benefits and policy instruments Shardul Agrawala and Samuel Fankhauser (eds), 2008, OECD, Paris, 133 pp, £21.00, ISBN 978 9 26404 603 0 Reviewed by Ian Burton* Scientist Emeritus, Adaptation and Impacts Research Group (AIRG), Meteorological Service of Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Downsview, ON M3S 5T4, Canada Estimating the costs of adaptation has recently blossomed challenging exercise in raising questions to which there into a growth industry. Cost estimate studies are proliferat- are, for the moment, no satisfactory answers; nor does it ing at a national level, by sectors and in global aggregate offer any immediate prospect of finding robust answers. terms. The emerging consensus seems to be that adap- The book’s greatest value to this reviewer is that it engen- tation costs are likely to be in the order of tens of billions ders serious reflection on whether the right questions are of dollars per annum within a few years, and that the being asked at all. reliability of these estimates is low. There are urgent ques- Adaptation runs a whole gamut of approaches from tions around these estimates. How much climate resili- place- and project-specific, through sectoral policies and ence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate and Development Taylor & Francis

book review

Climate and Development , Volume 1 (1): 2 – Mar 1, 2009
2 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1756-5537
eISSN
1756-5529
DOI
10.3763/cdev.2009.0011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Economic aspects of adaptation to climate change: Costs, benefits and policy instruments Shardul Agrawala and Samuel Fankhauser (eds), 2008, OECD, Paris, 133 pp, £21.00, ISBN 978 9 26404 603 0 Reviewed by Ian Burton* Scientist Emeritus, Adaptation and Impacts Research Group (AIRG), Meteorological Service of Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Downsview, ON M3S 5T4, Canada Estimating the costs of adaptation has recently blossomed challenging exercise in raising questions to which there into a growth industry. Cost estimate studies are proliferat- are, for the moment, no satisfactory answers; nor does it ing at a national level, by sectors and in global aggregate offer any immediate prospect of finding robust answers. terms. The emerging consensus seems to be that adap- The book’s greatest value to this reviewer is that it engen- tation costs are likely to be in the order of tens of billions ders serious reflection on whether the right questions are of dollars per annum within a few years, and that the being asked at all. reliability of these estimates is low. There are urgent ques- Adaptation runs a whole gamut of approaches from tions around these estimates. How much climate resili- place- and project-specific, through sectoral policies and ence

Journal

Climate and DevelopmentTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2009

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