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Breaking the School to Prison Pipeline: Identifying School Risk and Protective Factors for Youth Delinquency

Breaking the School to Prison Pipeline: Identifying School Risk and Protective Factors for Youth... Academic failure, exclusionary discipline practices, and dropout have been identified as key elements in a "school to prison pipeline." Although a strong body of research exists on the risks for delinquency, few studies have attempted to understand the variables within schools that exacerbate or counteract these risks. We conducted three multimethod studies that examined three school characteristics related to delinquency-academic failure, suspension, and dropout-at the elementary, middle, and high school levels respectively. We compared schools that were high performing with those that were low performing with respect to each of these characteristics. Our results suggest that school-level characteristics can help minimize the risks for youth delinquency. The majority of court-involved youth have experienced academic failure, school exclusion, and dropout. Our findings, in conjunction with those of other researchers, identified school-based policies and practices that may exacerbate or mitigate the risks for court involvement among youth. The results of our studies suggest that such school-level characteristics as supportive leadership, dedicated and collegial staff, schoolwide behavior management, and effective academic instruction can help minimize the risks for youth delinquency. Specific examples are provided from schools involved in these studies, in which positive school characteristics were evident. Implications and recommendations are offered for schools and school districts that wish to implement strategies that potentially protect students from the risks for delinquency. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Exceptionality Taylor & Francis

Breaking the School to Prison Pipeline: Identifying School Risk and Protective Factors for Youth Delinquency

20 pages

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References (43)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-7035
eISSN
0936-2835
DOI
10.1207/s15327035ex1302_2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Academic failure, exclusionary discipline practices, and dropout have been identified as key elements in a "school to prison pipeline." Although a strong body of research exists on the risks for delinquency, few studies have attempted to understand the variables within schools that exacerbate or counteract these risks. We conducted three multimethod studies that examined three school characteristics related to delinquency-academic failure, suspension, and dropout-at the elementary, middle, and high school levels respectively. We compared schools that were high performing with those that were low performing with respect to each of these characteristics. Our results suggest that school-level characteristics can help minimize the risks for youth delinquency. The majority of court-involved youth have experienced academic failure, school exclusion, and dropout. Our findings, in conjunction with those of other researchers, identified school-based policies and practices that may exacerbate or mitigate the risks for court involvement among youth. The results of our studies suggest that such school-level characteristics as supportive leadership, dedicated and collegial staff, schoolwide behavior management, and effective academic instruction can help minimize the risks for youth delinquency. Specific examples are provided from schools involved in these studies, in which positive school characteristics were evident. Implications and recommendations are offered for schools and school districts that wish to implement strategies that potentially protect students from the risks for delinquency.

Journal

ExceptionalityTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2005

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