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Business simulation as an active learning activity for developing soft skills

Business simulation as an active learning activity for developing soft skills Business simulations are innovative instruction models for active or cooperative learning. In this paper, we look at the social constructionist roots of these education models in light of the current efforts to enhance employability skills in undergraduate and graduate studies. More specifically, we analyse the role of business simulations in developing soft skills based on an international survey of students’ perceptions of developing soft skills during business simulations. Our objective is to test whether business simulations contribute to the development of soft skills and whether gender, ethno-cultural origin, and professional experience affect the acquisition process. We also discuss the use and benefits of these innovative instruction models. The analysis suggests the need to take into account specific factors, especially ethno-cultural origin, when instructing via business simulations. It also calls for sharing best practices in the context of a globalised education. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Accounting Education Taylor & Francis

Business simulation as an active learning activity for developing soft skills

Accounting Education , Volume 25 (4): 28 – Jul 3, 2016

Business simulation as an active learning activity for developing soft skills

Accounting Education , Volume 25 (4): 28 – Jul 3, 2016

Abstract

Business simulations are innovative instruction models for active or cooperative learning. In this paper, we look at the social constructionist roots of these education models in light of the current efforts to enhance employability skills in undergraduate and graduate studies. More specifically, we analyse the role of business simulations in developing soft skills based on an international survey of students’ perceptions of developing soft skills during business simulations. Our objective is to test whether business simulations contribute to the development of soft skills and whether gender, ethno-cultural origin, and professional experience affect the acquisition process. We also discuss the use and benefits of these innovative instruction models. The analysis suggests the need to take into account specific factors, especially ethno-cultural origin, when instructing via business simulations. It also calls for sharing best practices in the context of a globalised education.

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References (86)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1468-4489
eISSN
0963-9284
DOI
10.1080/09639284.2016.1191272
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Business simulations are innovative instruction models for active or cooperative learning. In this paper, we look at the social constructionist roots of these education models in light of the current efforts to enhance employability skills in undergraduate and graduate studies. More specifically, we analyse the role of business simulations in developing soft skills based on an international survey of students’ perceptions of developing soft skills during business simulations. Our objective is to test whether business simulations contribute to the development of soft skills and whether gender, ethno-cultural origin, and professional experience affect the acquisition process. We also discuss the use and benefits of these innovative instruction models. The analysis suggests the need to take into account specific factors, especially ethno-cultural origin, when instructing via business simulations. It also calls for sharing best practices in the context of a globalised education.

Journal

Accounting EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 3, 2016

Keywords: Accounting education; active learning; business simulations; soft skills; survey

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