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Central Asian geopolitics: The Indian view

Central Asian geopolitics: The Indian view Central Asian Survey (1997), 16(2), 237-268 Central Asian geopolitics: the Indian view MADAN MOHAN PURI It is commonplace that India has since antiquity had historic links with Central Asia, a region variously defined objectively as well as subjectively, depending upon one's historical or political context.1 The area with which this paper is concerned comprises the five republics of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrghyzstan and Kazakhstan, though the cultural/ethnic continuities or affinities there make some include parts of present-day Tibet, the Xinjiang province of China, and most of western Mongolia too. India's present connections with this Asia, however, have been both few and feeble, especially since it became a part of the Soviet Union. Now that the said constituents of the area have emerged as distinctly defined juridically sovereign entities, determined to play their due role in world affairs as actors of some significance, they are eager to reciprocate all foreign overtures. And if these come from 'civilization' states like India, feverishly modernizing themselves, the response is warm and wide-ranging. On its part, India naturally brings into play the historical memories of the past fruitful economic interaction and enriching cultural flows with this area. Archaeo- logical evidence establishes that the linkages http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Central Asian Survey Taylor & Francis

Central Asian geopolitics: The Indian view

Central Asian Survey , Volume 16 (2): 32 – Jun 1, 1997
32 pages

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References (9)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1465-3354
eISSN
0263-4937
DOI
10.1080/02634939708400986
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Central Asian Survey (1997), 16(2), 237-268 Central Asian geopolitics: the Indian view MADAN MOHAN PURI It is commonplace that India has since antiquity had historic links with Central Asia, a region variously defined objectively as well as subjectively, depending upon one's historical or political context.1 The area with which this paper is concerned comprises the five republics of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrghyzstan and Kazakhstan, though the cultural/ethnic continuities or affinities there make some include parts of present-day Tibet, the Xinjiang province of China, and most of western Mongolia too. India's present connections with this Asia, however, have been both few and feeble, especially since it became a part of the Soviet Union. Now that the said constituents of the area have emerged as distinctly defined juridically sovereign entities, determined to play their due role in world affairs as actors of some significance, they are eager to reciprocate all foreign overtures. And if these come from 'civilization' states like India, feverishly modernizing themselves, the response is warm and wide-ranging. On its part, India naturally brings into play the historical memories of the past fruitful economic interaction and enriching cultural flows with this area. Archaeo- logical evidence establishes that the linkages

Journal

Central Asian SurveyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 1997

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