Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Changing Radicalization to Resilience by Understanding Marginalization

Changing Radicalization to Resilience by Understanding Marginalization Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, 29:153–159 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN 1040-2659 print; 1469-9982 online DOI: 10.1080/10402659.2017.1308190 Changing Radicalization to Resilience by Understanding Marginalization Sherrill W. Hayes Public rhetoric about the radicalization of youth into violent extremism has been bifurcated into two competing explanations. In the first version, a radical religious leader within a mainstream religious community radicalizes young people. In the second, youth are “self-radicalized” through accessing extrem- ist materials on the Internet. Both these explanations are incomplete, however, without considering how individuals’ experiences of marginalization during the complex process of identity formation in adolescence might make them more vulnerable to extremist messages. The argument developed here is that if policy makers and practitioners focused more on assisting marginalized groups, they could change potential radicalization into resilience. When policy makers and media take a reductionist view on complex experiences, they have a difficult time explaining and predicting behavior. In the case of foreign-born or the children of foreign-born parents, it seems that the harder we look for radicalization in mosques, churches, and other religious communities, the less successful we are in finding it. Over the last few years, Conflict Management faculty and graduate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Peace Review Taylor & Francis

Changing Radicalization to Resilience by Understanding Marginalization

Peace Review , Volume 29 (2): 7 – Apr 3, 2017

Changing Radicalization to Resilience by Understanding Marginalization

Peace Review , Volume 29 (2): 7 – Apr 3, 2017

Abstract

Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, 29:153–159 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN 1040-2659 print; 1469-9982 online DOI: 10.1080/10402659.2017.1308190 Changing Radicalization to Resilience by Understanding Marginalization Sherrill W. Hayes Public rhetoric about the radicalization of youth into violent extremism has been bifurcated into two competing explanations. In the first version, a radical religious leader within a mainstream religious community radicalizes young people. In the second, youth are “self-radicalized” through accessing extrem- ist materials on the Internet. Both these explanations are incomplete, however, without considering how individuals’ experiences of marginalization during the complex process of identity formation in adolescence might make them more vulnerable to extremist messages. The argument developed here is that if policy makers and practitioners focused more on assisting marginalized groups, they could change potential radicalization into resilience. When policy makers and media take a reductionist view on complex experiences, they have a difficult time explaining and predicting behavior. In the case of foreign-born or the children of foreign-born parents, it seems that the harder we look for radicalization in mosques, churches, and other religious communities, the less successful we are in finding it. Over the last few years, Conflict Management faculty and graduate

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/changing-radicalization-to-resilience-by-understanding-marginalization-AzDC0jrxlX

References (7)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-9982
eISSN
1040-2659
DOI
10.1080/10402659.2017.1308190
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, 29:153–159 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN 1040-2659 print; 1469-9982 online DOI: 10.1080/10402659.2017.1308190 Changing Radicalization to Resilience by Understanding Marginalization Sherrill W. Hayes Public rhetoric about the radicalization of youth into violent extremism has been bifurcated into two competing explanations. In the first version, a radical religious leader within a mainstream religious community radicalizes young people. In the second, youth are “self-radicalized” through accessing extrem- ist materials on the Internet. Both these explanations are incomplete, however, without considering how individuals’ experiences of marginalization during the complex process of identity formation in adolescence might make them more vulnerable to extremist messages. The argument developed here is that if policy makers and practitioners focused more on assisting marginalized groups, they could change potential radicalization into resilience. When policy makers and media take a reductionist view on complex experiences, they have a difficult time explaining and predicting behavior. In the case of foreign-born or the children of foreign-born parents, it seems that the harder we look for radicalization in mosques, churches, and other religious communities, the less successful we are in finding it. Over the last few years, Conflict Management faculty and graduate

Journal

Peace ReviewTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 3, 2017

There are no references for this article.