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Comparative Peace Processes in Latin America

Comparative Peace Processes in Latin America tury, Lehman shows that Bolivia received a through missionary work, an agent of destruc- Congress, the President, and Central Ameri- disproportionately large share of aid, price tion to one of them. “Whatever disease [caused ca, 1976-1993 (1993) and assistant director her death],” Kupperman concludes, “the intol- of the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Latin Amer- subsidies, and loans, without being subjected erable stress created by this assignment must ican Program, contributes the introduction to U.S. military intervention. have made her vulnerable.” Moving the inter- and the conclusion. A welcome convenience Bargaining from weakness and dependence pretation is, but is it supportable? Or is it a case to any reader of this book is an appendix con- requires sophisticated maneuvering. Bolivia’s of bad evidence becoming better in the taining career summaries of each contributor. main twentieth-century weapons have been absence of good evidence? tin and coca, plus flexible nationalism, deftly The first thing that strikes the reader is the bending to the left or the right, frequently in uniqueness of each conflict and the singular At other times Kupperman is less helpful the hands of the same president. than one would wish on how evidence is to be paths to re-entry into http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History: Reviews of New Books Taylor & Francis

Comparative Peace Processes in Latin America

History: Reviews of New Books , Volume 28 (4): 1 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1930-8280
eISSN
0361-2759
DOI
10.1080/03612759.2000.10525558
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

tury, Lehman shows that Bolivia received a through missionary work, an agent of destruc- Congress, the President, and Central Ameri- disproportionately large share of aid, price tion to one of them. “Whatever disease [caused ca, 1976-1993 (1993) and assistant director her death],” Kupperman concludes, “the intol- of the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Latin Amer- subsidies, and loans, without being subjected erable stress created by this assignment must ican Program, contributes the introduction to U.S. military intervention. have made her vulnerable.” Moving the inter- and the conclusion. A welcome convenience Bargaining from weakness and dependence pretation is, but is it supportable? Or is it a case to any reader of this book is an appendix con- requires sophisticated maneuvering. Bolivia’s of bad evidence becoming better in the taining career summaries of each contributor. main twentieth-century weapons have been absence of good evidence? tin and coca, plus flexible nationalism, deftly The first thing that strikes the reader is the bending to the left or the right, frequently in uniqueness of each conflict and the singular At other times Kupperman is less helpful the hands of the same president. than one would wish on how evidence is to be paths to re-entry into

Journal

History: Reviews of New BooksTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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