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Concepts of culture: Public policy and the cultural industries

Concepts of culture: Public policy and the cultural industries CONCEPTS OF CULTURE: PUBLIC POLICY AND THE CULTURAL INDUSTRIES Nicholas Garnham's Concepts of Culture is an important document, not only for its internal positions and arguments, but also because of the context of its own production. It was written originally for a conference on the cultural industries in London, in December 1983, and published as a pamphlet by the Greater London Council (GLC). The immediate impetus to put the cultural industries on the political agenda of local government in London was the build-up of activity within both central government and private industry around plans for the introduction of cable television. The GLC was determined not to be reduced to a merely reactive position on this issue, but, once confronted, the question of what a cable policy might look like raised much larger questions. The Labour administration of the GLC under Ken Livingstone was attempting to construct an alternative to the top-down, national approach to economic strategy which, among other things, traditionally left the formulation of cultural policy to central government. The GLC wanted to develop, within the limitations of its power and resources, a strategy that combined popular planning with job creation. At the economic level, such cultural industries http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cultural Studies Taylor & Francis

Concepts of culture: Public policy and the cultural industries

Cultural Studies , Volume 1 (1): 15 – Jan 1, 1987

Concepts of culture: Public policy and the cultural industries

Cultural Studies , Volume 1 (1): 15 – Jan 1, 1987

Abstract

CONCEPTS OF CULTURE: PUBLIC POLICY AND THE CULTURAL INDUSTRIES Nicholas Garnham's Concepts of Culture is an important document, not only for its internal positions and arguments, but also because of the context of its own production. It was written originally for a conference on the cultural industries in London, in December 1983, and published as a pamphlet by the Greater London Council (GLC). The immediate impetus to put the cultural industries on the political agenda of local government in London was the build-up of activity within both central government and private industry around plans for the introduction of cable television. The GLC was determined not to be reduced to a merely reactive position on this issue, but, once confronted, the question of what a cable policy might look like raised much larger questions. The Labour administration of the GLC under Ken Livingstone was attempting to construct an alternative to the top-down, national approach to economic strategy which, among other things, traditionally left the formulation of cultural policy to central government. The GLC wanted to develop, within the limitations of its power and resources, a strategy that combined popular planning with job creation. At the economic level, such cultural industries

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Routledge
ISSN
1466-4348
eISSN
0950-2386
DOI
10.1080/09502388700490021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CONCEPTS OF CULTURE: PUBLIC POLICY AND THE CULTURAL INDUSTRIES Nicholas Garnham's Concepts of Culture is an important document, not only for its internal positions and arguments, but also because of the context of its own production. It was written originally for a conference on the cultural industries in London, in December 1983, and published as a pamphlet by the Greater London Council (GLC). The immediate impetus to put the cultural industries on the political agenda of local government in London was the build-up of activity within both central government and private industry around plans for the introduction of cable television. The GLC was determined not to be reduced to a merely reactive position on this issue, but, once confronted, the question of what a cable policy might look like raised much larger questions. The Labour administration of the GLC under Ken Livingstone was attempting to construct an alternative to the top-down, national approach to economic strategy which, among other things, traditionally left the formulation of cultural policy to central government. The GLC wanted to develop, within the limitations of its power and resources, a strategy that combined popular planning with job creation. At the economic level, such cultural industries

Journal

Cultural StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1987

There are no references for this article.