Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Constructing national security: Culture and identity in Indian arms control and disarmament practice

Constructing national security: Culture and identity in Indian arms control and disarmament practice Constructing National Security: Culture and Identity in Indian Arms Control and Disarmament Practice ANDREW LATHAM This study is about the way in which culturally conditioned ideas, images and 'institutional scripts' shape India's contemporary international security policy. In the extant literature, Indian foreign and defence policy has typically been analysed and explained in terms of the pursuit of the 'national interest'. Such 'realist' explanations assume rational, instrumental and interest-driven behaviour on the part of Indian policy-makers seeking to maximize India's power and security in an anarchic international environment. They further assume that India's interests (and threats to those interests) can be read off its relative position in the international system. In other words, they assume that India's national interests are the obvious and unambiguous correlates of India's location in the regional and global political order, and that Indian foreign policy practitioners both understand these interests and pursue them in a more or less 'rational' fashion. The problem with such realist approaches, however, is that while the concept of 'national interest' is a seductive one, it is 'too broad, too general, too vague and too all inclusive' to provide a reliable guide to understanding India's actual foreign policy practices.1 Indian policy-makers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Security Policy Taylor & Francis

Constructing national security: Culture and identity in Indian arms control and disarmament practice

Contemporary Security Policy , Volume 19 (1): 30 – Apr 1, 1998
30 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/constructing-national-security-culture-and-identity-in-indian-arms-txAUV3v2g6

References (23)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1743-8764
eISSN
1352-3260
DOI
10.1080/13523269808404181
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Constructing National Security: Culture and Identity in Indian Arms Control and Disarmament Practice ANDREW LATHAM This study is about the way in which culturally conditioned ideas, images and 'institutional scripts' shape India's contemporary international security policy. In the extant literature, Indian foreign and defence policy has typically been analysed and explained in terms of the pursuit of the 'national interest'. Such 'realist' explanations assume rational, instrumental and interest-driven behaviour on the part of Indian policy-makers seeking to maximize India's power and security in an anarchic international environment. They further assume that India's interests (and threats to those interests) can be read off its relative position in the international system. In other words, they assume that India's national interests are the obvious and unambiguous correlates of India's location in the regional and global political order, and that Indian foreign policy practitioners both understand these interests and pursue them in a more or less 'rational' fashion. The problem with such realist approaches, however, is that while the concept of 'national interest' is a seductive one, it is 'too broad, too general, too vague and too all inclusive' to provide a reliable guide to understanding India's actual foreign policy practices.1 Indian policy-makers

Journal

Contemporary Security PolicyTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.