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Contexts of meaning: young children's understanding of biological phenomena

Contexts of meaning: young children's understanding of biological phenomena The present study reported here explores the composition of young children's contexts of meaning. Specifically, the major concerns involve identifying (a) potential underlying beliefs that may influence the construction of concepts, (6) cognitive processes that contribute to the construction of concepts and meaning, (c) variables that affect conceptual development, and (d) variables that may influence the construction of meaning. Using earthworms as objects of discussion, 10 children in Grade 1 (6 years) to Grade 3 (8 years) were interviewed during 30‐45 minute sessions. From the data, a typology of children's thinking was developed that included: general categories of knowledge; mental processes; frameworks of belief, emotions, values and aesthetics. The components of this typology contribute to young children's construction of meaning about biological phenomena. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Science Education Taylor & Francis

Contexts of meaning: young children's understanding of biological phenomena

Contexts of meaning: young children's understanding of biological phenomena

International Journal of Science Education , Volume 12 (5): 13 – Oct 1, 1990

Abstract

The present study reported here explores the composition of young children's contexts of meaning. Specifically, the major concerns involve identifying (a) potential underlying beliefs that may influence the construction of concepts, (6) cognitive processes that contribute to the construction of concepts and meaning, (c) variables that affect conceptual development, and (d) variables that may influence the construction of meaning. Using earthworms as objects of discussion, 10 children in Grade 1 (6 years) to Grade 3 (8 years) were interviewed during 30‐45 minute sessions. From the data, a typology of children's thinking was developed that included: general categories of knowledge; mental processes; frameworks of belief, emotions, values and aesthetics. The components of this typology contribute to young children's construction of meaning about biological phenomena.

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References (13)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1464-5289
eISSN
0950-0693
DOI
10.1080/0950069900120507
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study reported here explores the composition of young children's contexts of meaning. Specifically, the major concerns involve identifying (a) potential underlying beliefs that may influence the construction of concepts, (6) cognitive processes that contribute to the construction of concepts and meaning, (c) variables that affect conceptual development, and (d) variables that may influence the construction of meaning. Using earthworms as objects of discussion, 10 children in Grade 1 (6 years) to Grade 3 (8 years) were interviewed during 30‐45 minute sessions. From the data, a typology of children's thinking was developed that included: general categories of knowledge; mental processes; frameworks of belief, emotions, values and aesthetics. The components of this typology contribute to young children's construction of meaning about biological phenomena.

Journal

International Journal of Science EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 1990

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