Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

CYBER-COMMUNISM: How the Americans are Superseding Capitalism in Cyberspace

CYBER-COMMUNISM: How the Americans are Superseding Capitalism in Cyberspace Science as Culture, Volume 9, Number 1, 2000 5 CYBER-COMMUNISM: How the Americans are Superseding Capitalism in Cyberspace RICHARD BARBROOK ¼ is the impact of the ¼ information revolution on capitalism not the ultimate exempli® cation of ¼ Marx’ s thesis that: `at a certain stage of their development, the material productive forces come into con¯ ict with the existing relations of pro- duction ¼ ’ ? ¼ does the prospect of the ¼ `global village’ not signal the end of market relations ¼ at least in the sphere of digitalised information? (ZizÏ ek, 1998, pp. 33± 34). GHOSTS IN THE MACHINE A spectre is haunting the Net: the spectre of communism. Re¯ ecting the extravagance of the new media, this spectre takes two distinct forms: the theoretical appropriation of Stalinist communism and the everyday practice of cyber-communism. Whatever their professed political beliefs, all users of the Net enthusiastically participate in this left-wing revival. Whether in theory or practice, each of them desires the digital transcendence of capitalism. Yet, at the same time, even the most dedicated leftist can no longer truly believe in communism. After the fall of the Berlin Wall and the implosion of the Soviet Union, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science as Culture Taylor & Francis

CYBER-COMMUNISM: How the Americans are Superseding Capitalism in Cyberspace

Science as Culture , Volume 9 (1): 36 – Mar 1, 2000
36 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/cyber-communism-how-the-americans-are-superseding-capitalism-in-4ktEFbAkg6

References (81)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1470-1189
eISSN
0950-5431
DOI
10.1080/095054300114314
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Science as Culture, Volume 9, Number 1, 2000 5 CYBER-COMMUNISM: How the Americans are Superseding Capitalism in Cyberspace RICHARD BARBROOK ¼ is the impact of the ¼ information revolution on capitalism not the ultimate exempli® cation of ¼ Marx’ s thesis that: `at a certain stage of their development, the material productive forces come into con¯ ict with the existing relations of pro- duction ¼ ’ ? ¼ does the prospect of the ¼ `global village’ not signal the end of market relations ¼ at least in the sphere of digitalised information? (ZizÏ ek, 1998, pp. 33± 34). GHOSTS IN THE MACHINE A spectre is haunting the Net: the spectre of communism. Re¯ ecting the extravagance of the new media, this spectre takes two distinct forms: the theoretical appropriation of Stalinist communism and the everyday practice of cyber-communism. Whatever their professed political beliefs, all users of the Net enthusiastically participate in this left-wing revival. Whether in theory or practice, each of them desires the digital transcendence of capitalism. Yet, at the same time, even the most dedicated leftist can no longer truly believe in communism. After the fall of the Berlin Wall and the implosion of the Soviet Union,

Journal

Science as CultureTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.