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Demand Theories of the Fertility Transition: An Iconoclastic View

Demand Theories of the Fertility Transition: An Iconoclastic View This paper challenges the widely held and influential view that the fertility transition is largely the consequence of changing parental demand for children brought about by changes in the economic costs and benefits entailed in childbearing. Using evidence from both historical and contemporary populations we argue that demand theories do not offer a plausible explanation of the fertility transition. Instead, we propose that ideational, rather than structural, economic change lies at the heart of the transition. In particular, we suggest that attitudes to birth control, broadly defined, play a crucial role. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Studies Taylor & Francis

Demand Theories of the Fertility Transition: An Iconoclastic View

Population Studies , Volume 41 (1): 26 – Mar 1, 1987

Demand Theories of the Fertility Transition: An Iconoclastic View

Population Studies , Volume 41 (1): 26 – Mar 1, 1987

Abstract

This paper challenges the widely held and influential view that the fertility transition is largely the consequence of changing parental demand for children brought about by changes in the economic costs and benefits entailed in childbearing. Using evidence from both historical and contemporary populations we argue that demand theories do not offer a plausible explanation of the fertility transition. Instead, we propose that ideational, rather than structural, economic change lies at the heart of the transition. In particular, we suggest that attitudes to birth control, broadly defined, play a crucial role.

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1477-4747
eISSN
0032-4728
DOI
10.1080/0032472031000142516
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper challenges the widely held and influential view that the fertility transition is largely the consequence of changing parental demand for children brought about by changes in the economic costs and benefits entailed in childbearing. Using evidence from both historical and contemporary populations we argue that demand theories do not offer a plausible explanation of the fertility transition. Instead, we propose that ideational, rather than structural, economic change lies at the heart of the transition. In particular, we suggest that attitudes to birth control, broadly defined, play a crucial role.

Journal

Population StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1987

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