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Destructuring and Criminal Justice Reforms: Rescuing Diversionary Ideas from the Waste-paper Basket

Destructuring and Criminal Justice Reforms: Rescuing Diversionary Ideas from the Waste-paper Basket Destructuring and Criminal Justice Reforms: Rescuing Diversionary Ideas from the Waste-paper Basket RICKSARRE* Introduction Over the last thirty or so years there has been a concerted effort by law reformers to move our societies towards a more community-based model of criminal justice and corrections, a process described by White and Perrone as 'destructuring' (1997:177). This model was made manifest, essentially, by the four 'd' words: diversion, decarceration, decriminalisation and de-institutionalisation. The first of these themes, diversion, is the subject of this paper. Like the other themes, diversionary practices were endorsed by reformers of the 1970s. The impetus for change, White and Perrone enthusiastically suggest, came from a combination of factors including high remand numbers, high recidivism rates, high costs, and the negative impacts of conventional methods of punishment - if not the system itself (Feeley 1979; Bottoms & McClean 1976) - on rehabilitation and reintegration of offenders into wider society. There was a real sense that there was a penal crisis looming, and that only by some drastic measures would it be averted Preston 1980). Keeping people out of the (e.g. Tomasic and Dobinson 1979; Bottoms and system at the 'front end' became the catch-cry. Despite the pitfalls and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Issues in Criminal Justice Taylor & Francis

Destructuring and Criminal Justice Reforms: Rescuing Diversionary Ideas from the Waste-paper Basket

Current Issues in Criminal Justice , Volume 10 (3): 14 – Mar 1, 1999

Destructuring and Criminal Justice Reforms: Rescuing Diversionary Ideas from the Waste-paper Basket

Current Issues in Criminal Justice , Volume 10 (3): 14 – Mar 1, 1999

Abstract

Destructuring and Criminal Justice Reforms: Rescuing Diversionary Ideas from the Waste-paper Basket RICKSARRE* Introduction Over the last thirty or so years there has been a concerted effort by law reformers to move our societies towards a more community-based model of criminal justice and corrections, a process described by White and Perrone as 'destructuring' (1997:177). This model was made manifest, essentially, by the four 'd' words: diversion, decarceration, decriminalisation and de-institutionalisation. The first of these themes, diversion, is the subject of this paper. Like the other themes, diversionary practices were endorsed by reformers of the 1970s. The impetus for change, White and Perrone enthusiastically suggest, came from a combination of factors including high remand numbers, high recidivism rates, high costs, and the negative impacts of conventional methods of punishment - if not the system itself (Feeley 1979; Bottoms & McClean 1976) - on rehabilitation and reintegration of offenders into wider society. There was a real sense that there was a penal crisis looming, and that only by some drastic measures would it be averted Preston 1980). Keeping people out of the (e.g. Tomasic and Dobinson 1979; Bottoms and system at the 'front end' became the catch-cry. Despite the pitfalls and

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References (8)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1999 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2206-9542
eISSN
1034-5329
DOI
10.1080/10345329.1999.12036135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Destructuring and Criminal Justice Reforms: Rescuing Diversionary Ideas from the Waste-paper Basket RICKSARRE* Introduction Over the last thirty or so years there has been a concerted effort by law reformers to move our societies towards a more community-based model of criminal justice and corrections, a process described by White and Perrone as 'destructuring' (1997:177). This model was made manifest, essentially, by the four 'd' words: diversion, decarceration, decriminalisation and de-institutionalisation. The first of these themes, diversion, is the subject of this paper. Like the other themes, diversionary practices were endorsed by reformers of the 1970s. The impetus for change, White and Perrone enthusiastically suggest, came from a combination of factors including high remand numbers, high recidivism rates, high costs, and the negative impacts of conventional methods of punishment - if not the system itself (Feeley 1979; Bottoms & McClean 1976) - on rehabilitation and reintegration of offenders into wider society. There was a real sense that there was a penal crisis looming, and that only by some drastic measures would it be averted Preston 1980). Keeping people out of the (e.g. Tomasic and Dobinson 1979; Bottoms and system at the 'front end' became the catch-cry. Despite the pitfalls and

Journal

Current Issues in Criminal JusticeTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1999

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