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Developments in Land Tenure on the Prior of Durham’s Estate in the Later Middle Ages

Developments in Land Tenure on the Prior of Durham’s Estate in the Later Middle Ages DEVELOPMENTS IN LAND TENURE ON THE PRIOR OF DURHAM'S ESTATE IN THE LATER MIDDLE AGES! R. A. LOMAS ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT social changes tha,t took place in late medieval England was, in the words of Professor M. McKisack, 'the demarcation of the agricultural population into three main strata - freeholders, tenant- farmers, and landless, or nearly landless, labourers', which, as she went on to say, 'was to form the characteristic pattern of English rural society until the end of the eighteenth century'. 2 The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the truth of her statement as regards one of the largest and wealthiest northern estates, that of the prior of Durham, by describing the changes and developments in land tenure between 1340 and 1500. How- ever, it is a necessary preliminary to establish the identity of the estate. The cathedral-priory of Durham possessed an immense amount of varied property scattered over northern England and south-eastern Scotland. Apart from the properties attached to the priory's cells,3 the estate was divided between six monk-obedientiaries - bursar, hostellar, almoner, sacrist, chamberlain, commoner - each of whom had a specific endowment from which he drew the income he required for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Northern History Taylor & Francis

Developments in Land Tenure on the Prior of Durham’s Estate in the Later Middle Ages

Northern History , Volume 13 (1): 17 – Jan 1, 1977

Developments in Land Tenure on the Prior of Durham’s Estate in the Later Middle Ages

Northern History , Volume 13 (1): 17 – Jan 1, 1977

Abstract

DEVELOPMENTS IN LAND TENURE ON THE PRIOR OF DURHAM'S ESTATE IN THE LATER MIDDLE AGES! R. A. LOMAS ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT social changes tha,t took place in late medieval England was, in the words of Professor M. McKisack, 'the demarcation of the agricultural population into three main strata - freeholders, tenant- farmers, and landless, or nearly landless, labourers', which, as she went on to say, 'was to form the characteristic pattern of English rural society until the end of the eighteenth century'. 2 The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the truth of her statement as regards one of the largest and wealthiest northern estates, that of the prior of Durham, by describing the changes and developments in land tenure between 1340 and 1500. How- ever, it is a necessary preliminary to establish the identity of the estate. The cathedral-priory of Durham possessed an immense amount of varied property scattered over northern England and south-eastern Scotland. Apart from the properties attached to the priory's cells,3 the estate was divided between six monk-obedientiaries - bursar, hostellar, almoner, sacrist, chamberlain, commoner - each of whom had a specific endowment from which he drew the income he required for

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References (1)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1977 Maney Publishing
ISSN
1745-8706
eISSN
0078-172X
DOI
10.1179/007817277790176759
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DEVELOPMENTS IN LAND TENURE ON THE PRIOR OF DURHAM'S ESTATE IN THE LATER MIDDLE AGES! R. A. LOMAS ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT social changes tha,t took place in late medieval England was, in the words of Professor M. McKisack, 'the demarcation of the agricultural population into three main strata - freeholders, tenant- farmers, and landless, or nearly landless, labourers', which, as she went on to say, 'was to form the characteristic pattern of English rural society until the end of the eighteenth century'. 2 The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the truth of her statement as regards one of the largest and wealthiest northern estates, that of the prior of Durham, by describing the changes and developments in land tenure between 1340 and 1500. How- ever, it is a necessary preliminary to establish the identity of the estate. The cathedral-priory of Durham possessed an immense amount of varied property scattered over northern England and south-eastern Scotland. Apart from the properties attached to the priory's cells,3 the estate was divided between six monk-obedientiaries - bursar, hostellar, almoner, sacrist, chamberlain, commoner - each of whom had a specific endowment from which he drew the income he required for

Journal

Northern HistoryTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1977

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