Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Differential Benefits from Scaffolding and Children Working Alone

Differential Benefits from Scaffolding and Children Working Alone Karmiloff-Smith's (1992) model of Representational Redescription (RR) describes a process by which implicit knowledge becomes progressively more explicit so that eventually it is consciously accessible and verbally statable. Previous investigations have examined the effectiveness of various interventions in relation to this model. However, none appears to have investigated the transfer of knowledge between different, but related, tasks. Such research is of practical and theoretical interest as it addresses issues about children's ability to use their knowledge of one task when later attempting to solve another related task. Our study was conducted to investigate whether experience with a balance beam task on which children succeed (balancing familiar everyday objects) could be transferred to a related problem. We examined the extent to which transfer of knowledge was assisted by adult scaffolding, a group discussion condition and a condition in which children worked alone. A total of 122 children aged between 5 and 7 years took part in the study. Overall, the scaffolding condition was the most effective. However, there was an exception to this, for one of the levels of representation, children at the abstraction nonverbal level were more likely to perform better on the transfer task if they had worked alone during the intervention. This finding provides support for Karmiloff-Smith's view that some levels of cognitive development involve endogenous processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Psychology Taylor & Francis

Differential Benefits from Scaffolding and Children Working Alone

Educational Psychology , Volume 20 (1): 15 – Mar 1, 2000
15 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/differential-benefits-from-scaffolding-and-children-working-alone-kl0pFexF08

References (36)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-5820
eISSN
0144-3410
DOI
10.1080/014434100110353
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Karmiloff-Smith's (1992) model of Representational Redescription (RR) describes a process by which implicit knowledge becomes progressively more explicit so that eventually it is consciously accessible and verbally statable. Previous investigations have examined the effectiveness of various interventions in relation to this model. However, none appears to have investigated the transfer of knowledge between different, but related, tasks. Such research is of practical and theoretical interest as it addresses issues about children's ability to use their knowledge of one task when later attempting to solve another related task. Our study was conducted to investigate whether experience with a balance beam task on which children succeed (balancing familiar everyday objects) could be transferred to a related problem. We examined the extent to which transfer of knowledge was assisted by adult scaffolding, a group discussion condition and a condition in which children worked alone. A total of 122 children aged between 5 and 7 years took part in the study. Overall, the scaffolding condition was the most effective. However, there was an exception to this, for one of the levels of representation, children at the abstraction nonverbal level were more likely to perform better on the transfer task if they had worked alone during the intervention. This finding provides support for Karmiloff-Smith's view that some levels of cognitive development involve endogenous processes.

Journal

Educational PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.