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Domestic diversity and fluidity among some African households in Greater Cape Town

Domestic diversity and fluidity among some African households in Greater Cape Town Domestic diversity and fluidity among some African households in Greater Cape Town Andrew Spiegel (a), Vanessa Watson (b) and Peter Wilkinson (c) (a) Department of Social Anthropology (b) Urban Problems Research Unit (c) School of Architecture and Planning University of Cape Town Introduction The notion of 'domestic fluidity' has only lately acquired some academic currency, both as phenomenon and concept. Our interest in the problem of domestic group pliancy and labile household compositions derives from recognising the problems of categorising settlement processes within Cape Town's African population where both individuals and households seemed to move almost continually. Our realisation that such movements implied great diversity in, and mutability of, domestic units led us to question certain assumptions that seem to underpin policies directed at the management of urbanisation processes, particularly the provision of housing and basic infrastructural and social services (Spiegel et al. 1994). For reasons we have just begun addressing, housing policy formation has, until very recently, tended to invoke a mode of 'standardising' or 'normalising' discourse.1 Its central, if often only implicit, point of reference is a model of stable, nuclear family-based households with regularized patterns of co-residence, commensality and income-pooling, as well as shared 'life projects' http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Dynamics Taylor & Francis

Domestic diversity and fluidity among some African households in Greater Cape Town

Social Dynamics , Volume 22 (1): 24 – Jan 1, 1996

Domestic diversity and fluidity among some African households in Greater Cape Town

Social Dynamics , Volume 22 (1): 24 – Jan 1, 1996

Abstract

Domestic diversity and fluidity among some African households in Greater Cape Town Andrew Spiegel (a), Vanessa Watson (b) and Peter Wilkinson (c) (a) Department of Social Anthropology (b) Urban Problems Research Unit (c) School of Architecture and Planning University of Cape Town Introduction The notion of 'domestic fluidity' has only lately acquired some academic currency, both as phenomenon and concept. Our interest in the problem of domestic group pliancy and labile household compositions derives from recognising the problems of categorising settlement processes within Cape Town's African population where both individuals and households seemed to move almost continually. Our realisation that such movements implied great diversity in, and mutability of, domestic units led us to question certain assumptions that seem to underpin policies directed at the management of urbanisation processes, particularly the provision of housing and basic infrastructural and social services (Spiegel et al. 1994). For reasons we have just begun addressing, housing policy formation has, until very recently, tended to invoke a mode of 'standardising' or 'normalising' discourse.1 Its central, if often only implicit, point of reference is a model of stable, nuclear family-based households with regularized patterns of co-residence, commensality and income-pooling, as well as shared 'life projects'

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References (24)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1940-7874
eISSN
0253-3952
DOI
10.1080/02533959608458599
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Domestic diversity and fluidity among some African households in Greater Cape Town Andrew Spiegel (a), Vanessa Watson (b) and Peter Wilkinson (c) (a) Department of Social Anthropology (b) Urban Problems Research Unit (c) School of Architecture and Planning University of Cape Town Introduction The notion of 'domestic fluidity' has only lately acquired some academic currency, both as phenomenon and concept. Our interest in the problem of domestic group pliancy and labile household compositions derives from recognising the problems of categorising settlement processes within Cape Town's African population where both individuals and households seemed to move almost continually. Our realisation that such movements implied great diversity in, and mutability of, domestic units led us to question certain assumptions that seem to underpin policies directed at the management of urbanisation processes, particularly the provision of housing and basic infrastructural and social services (Spiegel et al. 1994). For reasons we have just begun addressing, housing policy formation has, until very recently, tended to invoke a mode of 'standardising' or 'normalising' discourse.1 Its central, if often only implicit, point of reference is a model of stable, nuclear family-based households with regularized patterns of co-residence, commensality and income-pooling, as well as shared 'life projects'

Journal

Social DynamicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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