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Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship, and Gender-formation in Mao's China

Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship, and Gender-formation in Mao's China Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship and Gender-formation in Mao’s China 143 Fashion Theory, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp.143–172 Reprints available directly from the Publishers. Photocopying permitted by licence only. © 2001 Berg. Printed in the United Kingdom. IMAGE AVAILABLE ON HARDCOPY Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship, and Gender-formation Tina Mai Chen in Mao’s China The prevailing vision of the sartorial landscape of China under the leadership of Mao Zedong is one of masses of peasants and workers dressed in Mao suits of navy blue, khaki green, or grey. The uniformity of the clothes and the subdued colors represent an imagined homogeneity across the time and space of the Chinese nation from 1949 to 1976. Scholars of the period join Chinese citizens and Chinese Communist Party propagandists in perpetuating the image of Chinese communist fashion as differentiated by ethnicity but largely undifferentiated by class, gender, or age. Clothing of the Maoist period often elicits remarks about the “sexless” and “shapeless” appearance of society, while those concerned with dress in twentieth-century China generally prefer to focus their 144 Tina Mai Chen analytical gaze on pre-1949 cosmopolitan urban culture or the post-1976 “re-emergence” of Chinese fashion. Examination of the sartorial http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Fashion Theory Taylor & Francis

Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship, and Gender-formation in Mao's China

Fashion Theory , Volume 5 (2): 29 – May 1, 2001

Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship, and Gender-formation in Mao's China

Fashion Theory , Volume 5 (2): 29 – May 1, 2001

Abstract

Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship and Gender-formation in Mao’s China 143 Fashion Theory, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp.143–172 Reprints available directly from the Publishers. Photocopying permitted by licence only. © 2001 Berg. Printed in the United Kingdom. IMAGE AVAILABLE ON HARDCOPY Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship, and Gender-formation Tina Mai Chen in Mao’s China The prevailing vision of the sartorial landscape of China under the leadership of Mao Zedong is one of masses of peasants and workers dressed in Mao suits of navy blue, khaki green, or grey. The uniformity of the clothes and the subdued colors represent an imagined homogeneity across the time and space of the Chinese nation from 1949 to 1976. Scholars of the period join Chinese citizens and Chinese Communist Party propagandists in perpetuating the image of Chinese communist fashion as differentiated by ethnicity but largely undifferentiated by class, gender, or age. Clothing of the Maoist period often elicits remarks about the “sexless” and “shapeless” appearance of society, while those concerned with dress in twentieth-century China generally prefer to focus their 144 Tina Mai Chen analytical gaze on pre-1949 cosmopolitan urban culture or the post-1976 “re-emergence” of Chinese fashion. Examination of the sartorial

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References (52)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2001 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1751-7419
DOI
10.2752/136270401779108590
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship and Gender-formation in Mao’s China 143 Fashion Theory, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp.143–172 Reprints available directly from the Publishers. Photocopying permitted by licence only. © 2001 Berg. Printed in the United Kingdom. IMAGE AVAILABLE ON HARDCOPY Dressing for the Party: Clothing, Citizenship, and Gender-formation Tina Mai Chen in Mao’s China The prevailing vision of the sartorial landscape of China under the leadership of Mao Zedong is one of masses of peasants and workers dressed in Mao suits of navy blue, khaki green, or grey. The uniformity of the clothes and the subdued colors represent an imagined homogeneity across the time and space of the Chinese nation from 1949 to 1976. Scholars of the period join Chinese citizens and Chinese Communist Party propagandists in perpetuating the image of Chinese communist fashion as differentiated by ethnicity but largely undifferentiated by class, gender, or age. Clothing of the Maoist period often elicits remarks about the “sexless” and “shapeless” appearance of society, while those concerned with dress in twentieth-century China generally prefer to focus their 144 Tina Mai Chen analytical gaze on pre-1949 cosmopolitan urban culture or the post-1976 “re-emergence” of Chinese fashion. Examination of the sartorial

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Fashion TheoryTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 2001

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