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Drug markets and distribution systems

Drug markets and distribution systems Illicit drug markets are a part of our society. How visible and detrimental they are to their host communities has shaped enforcement action against them. Until the mid-1990s, open street-based markets were probably where most illicit drugs of dependency were bought and sold. With the steady rise in market activity, communities tired of the damage these markets caused, and demanded a police response. Quite separately, but around the same time, there was a proliferation in the ownership and use of mobile phones. Together, they provided open markets with both the impetus and the means to evolve into closed markets. Now this type of market is probably where most drugs of dependency are bought and sold. This article offers a classification of retail markets, distinguishing between open markets, closed markets, crack or dealing houses and other forms of retail system, and examines variations in the structure of distribution within these markets – mainly in the United Kingdom. At the same time, we also examine the available evidence on the ‘middle level’ drug markets that support these retail markets; and consider the relationship between supply, demand and enforcement, examining the adaptations that markets will make to enforcement and the perverse effects that enforcement may cause. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Addiction Research & Theory Taylor & Francis

Drug markets and distribution systems

Addiction Research & Theory , Volume 12 (6): 15 – Dec 1, 2004
15 pages

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References (53)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2004 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted
ISSN
1476-7392
eISSN
1606-6359
DOI
10.1080/16066350412331323119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Illicit drug markets are a part of our society. How visible and detrimental they are to their host communities has shaped enforcement action against them. Until the mid-1990s, open street-based markets were probably where most illicit drugs of dependency were bought and sold. With the steady rise in market activity, communities tired of the damage these markets caused, and demanded a police response. Quite separately, but around the same time, there was a proliferation in the ownership and use of mobile phones. Together, they provided open markets with both the impetus and the means to evolve into closed markets. Now this type of market is probably where most drugs of dependency are bought and sold. This article offers a classification of retail markets, distinguishing between open markets, closed markets, crack or dealing houses and other forms of retail system, and examines variations in the structure of distribution within these markets – mainly in the United Kingdom. At the same time, we also examine the available evidence on the ‘middle level’ drug markets that support these retail markets; and consider the relationship between supply, demand and enforcement, examining the adaptations that markets will make to enforcement and the perverse effects that enforcement may cause.

Journal

Addiction Research & TheoryTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2004

Keywords: Illicit drugs; Drug markets; Open markets; Closed markets; Middle markets

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