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Editorial and Introduction

Editorial and Introduction Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 8:207–218, 2010 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1535-0770 print/1535-0932 online DOI: 10.1080/15350770.2010.498735 INTRODUCTION SARAH HARPER, DPhil University of Oxford, Oxford, England PETER K. SMITH, PhD Goldsmiths College, London, England GUNHILD O. HAGESTAD, PhD University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway The steady decline in total fertility rates for all European Union (EU) coun- tries since the 1970s combined with a steady increase in longevity has resulted in the maturing of European populations (Harper, 2006). Since the millennium, there have been more older than younger dependents in the EU, meaning more people over 60 than under 15. This finding has resulted in a relative growth in the proportion of older adults, potential grandpar- ents, in the population. In addition, demographic aging affects both kinship structures and roles. The shift from a high mortality–high fertility society to a low mortality–low fertility society results in an increase in the num- ber of living generations, or intergenerational extension, and a decrease in the number of living relatives within each generation, or intragenera- tional contraction (Bengtson et al., 1990). Modern European families are more likely than before to be both multigenerational and slim. What is termed the “beanpole family” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal Of Intergenerational Relationships Taylor & Francis

Editorial and Introduction

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References (64)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1535-0932
eISSN
1535-0770
DOI
10.1080/15350770.2010.498735
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 8:207–218, 2010 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1535-0770 print/1535-0932 online DOI: 10.1080/15350770.2010.498735 INTRODUCTION SARAH HARPER, DPhil University of Oxford, Oxford, England PETER K. SMITH, PhD Goldsmiths College, London, England GUNHILD O. HAGESTAD, PhD University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway The steady decline in total fertility rates for all European Union (EU) coun- tries since the 1970s combined with a steady increase in longevity has resulted in the maturing of European populations (Harper, 2006). Since the millennium, there have been more older than younger dependents in the EU, meaning more people over 60 than under 15. This finding has resulted in a relative growth in the proportion of older adults, potential grandpar- ents, in the population. In addition, demographic aging affects both kinship structures and roles. The shift from a high mortality–high fertility society to a low mortality–low fertility society results in an increase in the num- ber of living generations, or intergenerational extension, and a decrease in the number of living relatives within each generation, or intragenera- tional contraction (Bengtson et al., 1990). Modern European families are more likely than before to be both multigenerational and slim. What is termed the “beanpole family”

Journal

Journal Of Intergenerational RelationshipsTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2010

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