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Education in the Context of Structural Injustice: A symposium response

Education in the Context of Structural Injustice: A symposium response What an honor to have political and educational theorists of such caliber take up ideas from my work! What a daunting task to try to respond! My remarks will touch on the following questions: What are some key issues of distributive justice in education today? Why does defining justice in terms of oppression and domination imply that issues of justice cannot be reduced to distribution? How does normalization constitute a major process enacting oppression, and what does this imply for education? What does it mean to include marginalized groups in economic opportunity and democratic process, and how can educational institutions foster such inclusion? Why do issues of religion and other forms of cultural expression belong to a distinct category of justice? Are values of freedom of expression and tolerance in tension with the project of democratic inclusion? How shall we consider transnational issues of educational justice? http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Philosophy and Theory Taylor & Francis

Education in the Context of Structural Injustice: A symposium response

Educational Philosophy and Theory , Volume 38 (1): 11 – Jan 1, 2006
11 pages

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References (12)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-5812
eISSN
0013-1857
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-5812.2006.00177.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

What an honor to have political and educational theorists of such caliber take up ideas from my work! What a daunting task to try to respond! My remarks will touch on the following questions: What are some key issues of distributive justice in education today? Why does defining justice in terms of oppression and domination imply that issues of justice cannot be reduced to distribution? How does normalization constitute a major process enacting oppression, and what does this imply for education? What does it mean to include marginalized groups in economic opportunity and democratic process, and how can educational institutions foster such inclusion? Why do issues of religion and other forms of cultural expression belong to a distinct category of justice? Are values of freedom of expression and tolerance in tension with the project of democratic inclusion? How shall we consider transnational issues of educational justice?

Journal

Educational Philosophy and TheoryTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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