Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Estimating series of vital rates and age structures from baptisms and burials: A new technique, with applications to pre-industrial England*

Estimating series of vital rates and age structures from baptisms and burials: A new technique,... Abstract This paper presents a technique for deriving demographic information from long aggregate time series of baptisms and burials. Specifically, this technique provides quinquennial estimates of population size, age structure, life expectancy and gross reproduction rates. It assumes that age-specific fertility and mortality schedules belong to one-parameter families, and that the effects of net migration and under-registration cancel. It complements reconstitution analysis by providing temporal detail, and by testing the consistency of estimated vital rates with the aggregate series. It is preferable to stable population analysis for many historical applications since it does not assume stability. The method is applied to Colyton data, 1545 to 1834, confirming Wrigley's results and adding some new detail. The method is also applied to Brownlee's version of Rickman's data for England, 1701 to 1840. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Studies Taylor & Francis

Estimating series of vital rates and age structures from baptisms and burials: A new technique, with applications to pre-industrial England*

Population Studies , Volume 28 (3): 18 – Nov 1, 1974

Estimating series of vital rates and age structures from baptisms and burials: A new technique, with applications to pre-industrial England*

Population Studies , Volume 28 (3): 18 – Nov 1, 1974

Abstract

Abstract This paper presents a technique for deriving demographic information from long aggregate time series of baptisms and burials. Specifically, this technique provides quinquennial estimates of population size, age structure, life expectancy and gross reproduction rates. It assumes that age-specific fertility and mortality schedules belong to one-parameter families, and that the effects of net migration and under-registration cancel. It complements reconstitution analysis by providing temporal detail, and by testing the consistency of estimated vital rates with the aggregate series. It is preferable to stable population analysis for many historical applications since it does not assume stability. The method is applied to Colyton data, 1545 to 1834, confirming Wrigley's results and adding some new detail. The method is also applied to Brownlee's version of Rickman's data for England, 1701 to 1840.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/estimating-series-of-vital-rates-and-age-structures-from-baptisms-and-27RyamjO8S

References (10)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1477-4747
eISSN
0032-4728
DOI
10.1080/00324728.1974.10405195
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This paper presents a technique for deriving demographic information from long aggregate time series of baptisms and burials. Specifically, this technique provides quinquennial estimates of population size, age structure, life expectancy and gross reproduction rates. It assumes that age-specific fertility and mortality schedules belong to one-parameter families, and that the effects of net migration and under-registration cancel. It complements reconstitution analysis by providing temporal detail, and by testing the consistency of estimated vital rates with the aggregate series. It is preferable to stable population analysis for many historical applications since it does not assume stability. The method is applied to Colyton data, 1545 to 1834, confirming Wrigley's results and adding some new detail. The method is also applied to Brownlee's version of Rickman's data for England, 1701 to 1840.

Journal

Population StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 1974

There are no references for this article.