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Excavations at Castle Acre Castle, Norfolk, 1972–77 Country House and Castle of the Norman Earls of Surrey

Excavations at Castle Acre Castle, Norfolk, 1972–77 Country House and Castle of the Norman Earls... Excavations in the upper ward of Castle Acre Castle from 1972–77 revealed a very remarkable construction sequence in the century or so after the Norman Conquest. The first stone building, notable for its size and sophistication, is best described as a country house, surrounded by modest defences. In the first half of the twelfth century this was replanned as a keep but was apparently not completed before it was truncated, occupation being confined to the north half. These two later phases, which ended with the abandonment of the upper ward by c.1200, were accompanied by successive strengthenings of the perimeter defences. A rich variety of finds was recovered, associated with the three main building periods. Limited excavation was also undertaken in the lower ward, the barbican and on the northern line of the town defences. Excavations resumed in 1981 revealed more of the defences of the lower ward, the eastern gatehouse, inner moat, and bridge. These will be subjects of a further report. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archaeological Journal Taylor & Francis

Excavations at Castle Acre Castle, Norfolk, 1972–77 Country House and Castle of the Norman Earls of Surrey

Archaeological Journal , Volume 139 (1): 164 – Jan 1, 1982

Excavations at Castle Acre Castle, Norfolk, 1972–77 Country House and Castle of the Norman Earls of Surrey

Archaeological Journal , Volume 139 (1): 164 – Jan 1, 1982

Abstract

Excavations in the upper ward of Castle Acre Castle from 1972–77 revealed a very remarkable construction sequence in the century or so after the Norman Conquest. The first stone building, notable for its size and sophistication, is best described as a country house, surrounded by modest defences. In the first half of the twelfth century this was replanned as a keep but was apparently not completed before it was truncated, occupation being confined to the north half. These two later phases, which ended with the abandonment of the upper ward by c.1200, were accompanied by successive strengthenings of the perimeter defences. A rich variety of finds was recovered, associated with the three main building periods. Limited excavation was also undertaken in the lower ward, the barbican and on the northern line of the town defences. Excavations resumed in 1981 revealed more of the defences of the lower ward, the eastern gatehouse, inner moat, and bridge. These will be subjects of a further report.

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References (20)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1982 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2373-2288
eISSN
0066-5983
DOI
10.1080/00665983.1982.11078537
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Excavations in the upper ward of Castle Acre Castle from 1972–77 revealed a very remarkable construction sequence in the century or so after the Norman Conquest. The first stone building, notable for its size and sophistication, is best described as a country house, surrounded by modest defences. In the first half of the twelfth century this was replanned as a keep but was apparently not completed before it was truncated, occupation being confined to the north half. These two later phases, which ended with the abandonment of the upper ward by c.1200, were accompanied by successive strengthenings of the perimeter defences. A rich variety of finds was recovered, associated with the three main building periods. Limited excavation was also undertaken in the lower ward, the barbican and on the northern line of the town defences. Excavations resumed in 1981 revealed more of the defences of the lower ward, the eastern gatehouse, inner moat, and bridge. These will be subjects of a further report.

Journal

Archaeological JournalTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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