Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Francis Bacon on Verticity and the Bowels of the Earth

Francis Bacon on Verticity and the Bowels of the Earth AMBIX, Vol. 26, Part 3, November 1979 By GRAHAM REES* IN his speculative capacity Bacon liked to cast his nets wide and in so doing caught some very strange fish-none stranger perhaps than the unnoticed articulation of his world system which I propose to discuss here. Consideration of this articulation and its theoretical setting sheds light on Bacon's modes of thought, allows us to penetrate another unknown province of his positive philosophy and so link up further seemingly unconnected passages in his writings with the vast array of scattered materials already unearthed and pieced together in the reconstruction of his speculative thought. As I have shown elsewhere, Bacon'·s speculative philosophy rests on a chemical theory of matter! the chief component of which is the notion of the two quaternions, a notion whose origins are to be found in Paracelsian tradition.2 The bi-quaternion theory was designed in part to sustain claims for the existence of a cosmic diurnal motion in the heavens and in certain terrestrial bodies. Following Alpetragius Bacon asserted that the celestial bodies circled the static, central earth from east to west once every twenty-four hours, that periodic motion was a mere appearance (an abatement of the diurnal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ambix: The Journal of the Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry Taylor & Francis

Francis Bacon on Verticity and the Bowels of the Earth

Francis Bacon on Verticity and the Bowels of the Earth


Abstract

AMBIX, Vol. 26, Part 3, November 1979 By GRAHAM REES* IN his speculative capacity Bacon liked to cast his nets wide and in so doing caught some very strange fish-none stranger perhaps than the unnoticed articulation of his world system which I propose to discuss here. Consideration of this articulation and its theoretical setting sheds light on Bacon's modes of thought, allows us to penetrate another unknown province of his positive philosophy and so link up further seemingly unconnected passages in his writings with the vast array of scattered materials already unearthed and pieced together in the reconstruction of his speculative thought. As I have shown elsewhere, Bacon'·s speculative philosophy rests on a chemical theory of matter! the chief component of which is the notion of the two quaternions, a notion whose origins are to be found in Paracelsian tradition.2 The bi-quaternion theory was designed in part to sustain claims for the existence of a cosmic diurnal motion in the heavens and in certain terrestrial bodies. Following Alpetragius Bacon asserted that the celestial bodies circled the static, central earth from east to west once every twenty-four hours, that periodic motion was a mere appearance (an abatement of the diurnal

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/francis-bacon-on-verticity-and-the-bowels-of-the-earth-MqChApYWAq

References (5)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1979 Maney Publishing
ISSN
1745-8234
eISSN
0002-6980
DOI
10.1179/amb.1979.26.3.202
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AMBIX, Vol. 26, Part 3, November 1979 By GRAHAM REES* IN his speculative capacity Bacon liked to cast his nets wide and in so doing caught some very strange fish-none stranger perhaps than the unnoticed articulation of his world system which I propose to discuss here. Consideration of this articulation and its theoretical setting sheds light on Bacon's modes of thought, allows us to penetrate another unknown province of his positive philosophy and so link up further seemingly unconnected passages in his writings with the vast array of scattered materials already unearthed and pieced together in the reconstruction of his speculative thought. As I have shown elsewhere, Bacon'·s speculative philosophy rests on a chemical theory of matter! the chief component of which is the notion of the two quaternions, a notion whose origins are to be found in Paracelsian tradition.2 The bi-quaternion theory was designed in part to sustain claims for the existence of a cosmic diurnal motion in the heavens and in certain terrestrial bodies. Following Alpetragius Bacon asserted that the celestial bodies circled the static, central earth from east to west once every twenty-four hours, that periodic motion was a mere appearance (an abatement of the diurnal

Journal

Ambix: The Journal of the Society for the History of Alchemy and ChemistryTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 1979

There are no references for this article.