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Gender Norms as Asymmetric Institutions: A Case Study of Yoruba Women in Nigeria

Gender Norms as Asymmetric Institutions: A Case Study of Yoruba Women in Nigeria JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC ISSUES Vol. XLI No.4 December 2007 del Gender Norms as Asymmetric Institutions: A Case Study of Yoruba Women in Nigeria. Irene van Staveren and Olasunbo Odebode For the modern man the patriarchal relation of status is by no means the dominant feature of life; but for the women on the other hand, and for the upper-middle class women especially, confined as they are by prescription and by economic circumstances to their 'domestic sphere,' this relation is the most real and most formative factor of life. (Thorstein Veblen [18991 1931, 324) While a century ago, institutional economists like Thorstein Veblen recognized gender norms as important institutions in the economy, today this particular type of institution receives less attention in institutional analysis. At the same time, feminist economists have found the notion of an institution useful for the analysis of the relationships between gender and the economy. We will argue that the understanding of gender norms as institutions necessitates a distinction between institutions that have similar effects for everyone and institutions that have asymmetric effects, that is, systematically different effects on different groups. We will illustrate our argument with a case study on the livelihoods of Yo rub http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Economic Issues Taylor & Francis

Gender Norms as Asymmetric Institutions: A Case Study of Yoruba Women in Nigeria

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References (45)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2007 by Journal of Economic Issues–Association for Evolutionary Economics.
ISSN
1946-326X
eISSN
0021-3624
DOI
10.1080/00213624.2007.11507080
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC ISSUES Vol. XLI No.4 December 2007 del Gender Norms as Asymmetric Institutions: A Case Study of Yoruba Women in Nigeria. Irene van Staveren and Olasunbo Odebode For the modern man the patriarchal relation of status is by no means the dominant feature of life; but for the women on the other hand, and for the upper-middle class women especially, confined as they are by prescription and by economic circumstances to their 'domestic sphere,' this relation is the most real and most formative factor of life. (Thorstein Veblen [18991 1931, 324) While a century ago, institutional economists like Thorstein Veblen recognized gender norms as important institutions in the economy, today this particular type of institution receives less attention in institutional analysis. At the same time, feminist economists have found the notion of an institution useful for the analysis of the relationships between gender and the economy. We will argue that the understanding of gender norms as institutions necessitates a distinction between institutions that have similar effects for everyone and institutions that have asymmetric effects, that is, systematically different effects on different groups. We will illustrate our argument with a case study on the livelihoods of Yo rub

Journal

Journal of Economic IssuesTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2007

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