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Gender, Work Intensity, and Well-Being of Thai Home-Based Workers

Gender, Work Intensity, and Well-Being of Thai Home-Based Workers Abstract The contribution explores the time-use dimensions of the individual well-being of home-based workers in Thailand's urban squatter communities to demonstrate how time-use patterns provide information regarding individual experiences in performing economic activities that affect quality of life. The study focuses on two groups of home-based workers: the self-employed, and those who work for a contractor. Using an individual-level well-being index that takes into account income, the capabilities related to education, and work intensity, the authors examine by OLS and GME techniques the varied factors that affect the well-being of home-based workers. The findings show that women workers experience a higher incidence of work intensity and hence lower quality of life compared with men. A better understanding of the factors that promote or lower well-being can help policy-makers design more effective programs and economic and social policies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Feminist Economics Taylor & Francis

Gender, Work Intensity, and Well-Being of Thai Home-Based Workers

Feminist Economics , Volume 16 (3): 40 – Jul 1, 2010
40 pages

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References (52)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4372
eISSN
1354-5701
DOI
10.1080/13545701.2010.499657
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The contribution explores the time-use dimensions of the individual well-being of home-based workers in Thailand's urban squatter communities to demonstrate how time-use patterns provide information regarding individual experiences in performing economic activities that affect quality of life. The study focuses on two groups of home-based workers: the self-employed, and those who work for a contractor. Using an individual-level well-being index that takes into account income, the capabilities related to education, and work intensity, the authors examine by OLS and GME techniques the varied factors that affect the well-being of home-based workers. The findings show that women workers experience a higher incidence of work intensity and hence lower quality of life compared with men. A better understanding of the factors that promote or lower well-being can help policy-makers design more effective programs and economic and social policies.

Journal

Feminist EconomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2010

Keywords: Well-being; time use; work intensity; home-based workers; informal sector

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